Week FAQs:


Q: Is a week a time unit equal to seven days?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a week officially adopted by Constantine in AD 321?

A: Yes, and the nundinal cycle had fallen out of use.

Q: Was a week used in Ancient Rome and possibly in the pre-Christian Celtic calendar?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a week originally named for the classical planets?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a week found in the Akan Calendar?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a week 23?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a week found in Baltic languages and in Welsh?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a week adopted in Late Antiquity?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a week based on the Babylonian tradition?

A: Yes, although going through certain adaptations.

Q: Is a week 6 February AD 60?

A: Yes, and identified as a "Sunday" in a Pompeiian graffito.

Q: Is a week named in many languages by a word derived from "seven"?

A: Yes, The archaism sennight preserves the old Germanic practice of reckoning time by nights, as in the more common fortnight.

Q: Is a week named after the classical planets in the Roman era?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a week known in India by the 6th century, referenced in the Pañcasiddhāntikā.?

A: Yes, Shashi mentions the Garga Samhita, which he places in the 1st century BC or AD, as a possible earlier reference to a seven-day week in India.