Wear FAQs:


Q: Is wear related to interactions between surfaces and specifically the removal and deformation of material on a surface as a result of mechanical action of the opposite surface?

A: Yes.

Q: Is wear oxidised in air?

A: Yes.

Q: Is wear commonly classified according to the type of contact and the contact environment?

A: Yes.

Q: Is wear the repeated cyclical rubbing between two surfaces?

A: Yes.

Q: Is wear a common fault factor in industrial applications such as sheet metal forming and commonly encountered in conjunction with lubricant failures and are often referred to as welding wear or galling due to the exhibited surface characteristics?

A: Yes, and phase transition and plastic flow followed by cooling.

Q: Is wear part of the discipline of tribology?

A: Yes.

Q: Is wear erosion or sideways displacement of material from its "derivative" and original position on a solid surface performed by the action of another surface?

A: Yes.

Q: Is wear dependent upon a number of factors?

A: Yes.

Q: Is wear caused by the impact of particles of solid or liquid against the surface of an object?

A: Yes.

Q: Is wear known as two-body and three-body abrasive wear?

A: Yes.

Q: Is wear a mixture of corrosion?

A: Yes, and wear and the synergistic term of corrosion-wear which is also called tribocorrosion.

Q: Is wear caused by relative motion?

A: Yes, and "direct contact" and plastic deformation which create wear debris and material transfer from one surface to another.

Q: Is wear produced when the wear particles are detached by cyclic crack growth of microcracks on the surface?

A: Yes.

Q: Is wear classified as open or closed?

A: Yes.

Q: Is wear all such examples?

A: Yes.

Q: Is wear chemical reaction between the worn material and the corroding medium?

A: Yes.