Valve FAQs:


Q: Is a valve a device that regulates?

A: Yes, and directs or controls the flow of a fluid by opening, closing, or partially obstructing various passageways.

Q: Is a valve very large?

A: Yes.

Q: Are valves also used in the military and transport sectors?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a valve shut?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a valve a valve whose body has four ports equally spaced round the body and the disc has two passages to connect adjacent ports?

A: Yes.

Q: Are valves technically fittings?

A: Yes, but are usually discussed as a separate category.

Q: Is a valve almost always connected at its ports to pipes or other components?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a valve much less liable to leak when shut while hard seated valves are more durable?

A: Yes.

Q: Are valves represented by certain symbols?

A: Yes.

Q: Are valves valves which are used to control other valves?

A: Yes.

Q: Are valves typically used in sulphuric acid plants?

A: Yes, and whilst monel valves are used in hydrofluoric acid plants.

Q: Are valves sampling valves?

A: Yes, and which are only opened while a sample is taken.

Q: Are valves made in which the flow can go in either direction between the two ports?

A: Yes, when a valve is placed into a certain application, flow is often expected to go from one certain port on the upstream side of the valve, to the other port on the downstream side.

Q: Is a valve usually identified also?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a valve shut to stop flow?

A: Yes, and between the disc and the seat.

Q: Is a valve called a quarter-turn valve?

A: Yes.

Q: Are valves controlled manually with a handle attached to the stem?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a valve the body and the bonnet?

A: Yes.

Q: Are valves often used in high temperature applications?

A: Yes, such as nuclear plants, whilst inconel valves are often used in hydrogen applications.

Q: Are valves emergency shut-down valves?

A: Yes, and which are kept open when the system is in operation and will automatically shut by taking away the power supply.

Q: Are valves usually hard seated while butterfly?

A: Yes, and ball, plug, and diaphragm valves are usually soft seated.

Q: Are valves quite diverse and may be classified into a number of basic types?

A: Yes.

Q: Are valves typically rated for maximum temperature and pressure by the manufacturer?

A: Yes.

Q: Are valves made to be operated in a gradual change between two or more positions?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a valve collectively referred to as a valve's trim?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a valve simply a freely hinged flap which drops to obstruct fluid flow in one direction?

A: Yes, but is pushed open by flow in the opposite direction.

Q: Are valves not designed to precisely control intermediate degree of flow?

A: Yes, such valves are considered to be either open or shut.

Q: Are valves purge-gas supply valves or emergency-relief valves?

A: Yes.

Q: Are valves specially designed to regulate varying amounts of flow?

A: Yes.

Q: Are valves found in virtually every industrial process?

A: Yes, and including water and sewage processing, mining, power generation, processing of oil, gas and petroleum, food manufacturing, chemical and plastic manufacturing and many other fields.

Q: Are valves often quarter-turn valves?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a valve open?

A: Yes, but in many cases other indications of flow rate are used, such as separate flow meters.