Turbine FAQs:


Q: Is a turbine a turbomachine with at least one moving part called a rotor assembly?

A: Yes, and which is a shaft or drum with blades attached.

Q: Are turbines often part of a larger machine?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a turbine used to generate electricity?

A: Yes, and which then powers an electric motor connected to the mechanical load.

Q: Are turbines better suited to higher flow velocities or applications where the fluid head is low?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a turbine slightly higher than the equivalent impulse turbine for the same thermal energy conversion?

A: Yes.

Q: Were turbines traditionally more impulse but continue to move towards reaction designs similar to those used in gas turbines?

A: Yes.

Q: Are turbines used for the generation of electricity in thermal power plants?

A: Yes, such as plants using coal, fuel oil or nuclear fuel.

Q: Is a turbine its specific speed?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a turbine given both to British engineer Sir Charles Parsons for invention of the reaction turbine?

A: Yes, and to Swedish engineer Gustaf de Laval for invention of the impulse turbine.

Q: Are turbines sometimes referred to as turbine engines?

A: Yes.

Q: Are turbines most efficient for use in cases where the flow is low and the inlet pressure is high?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a turbine a water turbine which uses the principle of the Archimedean screw to convert the potential energy of water on an upstream level into kinetic energy?

A: Yes.