Tunnel FAQs:


Q: Is a tunnel an underground passageway?

A: Yes, and dug through the surrounding soil/earth/rock and enclosed except for entrance and exit, commonly at each end.

Q: Is a tunnel 10?

A: Yes.

Q: Are tunnels effectively one on the same centre line and are regarded as one?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a tunnel opened in 1966?

A: Yes, and in Stockholm, Sweden, and the New Elbe road tunnel opened in 1975 in Hamburg, Germany.

Q: Was a tunnel used as an air raid shelter?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a tunnel in use from 1832 being used to transport building materials to the new Lime St station while under construction?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a tunnel going to be long?

A: Yes, and multiple shafts at various locations may be bored so that entrance to the tunnel is closer to the unexcavated area.

Q: Is a tunnel subject to serious groundwater pressure?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a tunnel the longest stormwater tunnel in South East Asia and second longest in Asia?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a tunnel to be a part of the Merseyrail metro network?

A: Yes, and with work started and abandoned because of costs.

Q: Is a tunnel said to be the hole made by an arrow of the troll Hestmannen?

A: Yes, and the hill being the hat of the troll-king of Sømna trying to save the beautiful Lekamøya.

Q: Was a tunnel enlarged using a borrowed TBM so as to be able to take ISO containers?

A: Yes.

Q: Were tunnels equipped with lighting?

A: Yes, and ventilation, telephones, drainage pumps, hydraulic elevators, and in at least one instance, an electrified rail transport system.

Q: Is a tunnel disused?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a tunnel generally more costly to construct than a bridge?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a tunnel in excellent condition and is still being considered for reuse by Merseyrail?

A: Yes, and maybe with an underground station cut into the tunnel for Liverpool university.

Q: Was a tunnel initially used only for rail freight serving the Waterloo Freight terminal?

A: Yes, and later freight and passengers serving the Liverpool ship liner terminal.

Q: Was a tunnel reopened in 1973?

A: Yes.

Q: Are tunnels not for transport at all but rather?

A: Yes, and are fortifications, for example Mittelwerk and Cheyenne Mountain Complex.

Q: Was a tunnel only re-established in the 19th century by German archaeologists?

A: Yes.

Q: Were tunnels occasionally used?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a tunnel being planned or constructed?

A: Yes, and economics and politics play a large factor in the decision making process.

Q: Is a tunnel constructed in it?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a tunnel converted to a railway tunnel in 1869 and was a part of the East London Line of the London Underground until 2007?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a tunnel 3,083 yards in length on the Cromford Canal in Ripley?

A: Yes, and Derbyshire, England.

Q: Is a tunnel used?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a tunnel constructed which carries the "Golden Valley" railway line between Swindon and Gloucester?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a tunnel built before 701 BCE for a reliable supply of water?

A: Yes, and to withstand siege attacks.

Q: Is a tunnel going to be built?

A: Yes.

Q: Are tunnels unknown but theories connect it to a rebirth ritual?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a tunnel being considered for reuse by the Merseyrail network?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a tunnel opened in late 1886?

A: Yes, and at 7.008 km long, although only 3.62 km of the tunnel is actually under the River Severn.

Q: Are tunnels extended in 1984 and 1989?

A: Yes.

Q: Were tunnels chosen over bridges for strategic considerations?

A: Yes, in the event of damage, bridges would prevent US Navy vessels from leaving Naval Station Norfolk.

Q: Was a tunnel built using the cut-and-cover method with prefabricated forms in order to keep the busy railway operating?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a tunnel relatively long and narrow?

A: Yes, the length is often much greater than twice the diameter, although similar shorter excavations can be constructed, such as cross passages between tunnels.

Q: Is a tunnel presently under a narrow part of a lake formed by a dam some kilometers further downstream?

A: Yes.

Q: Are tunnels dug in types of materials varying from soft clay to hard rock?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a tunnel made operational?

A: Yes, and opening prior to the Liverpool tunnels on the Liverpool to Manchester line.

Q: Was a tunnel made redundant in 1844 when the tramway was dismantled?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a tunnel on the Dudley Canal?

A: Yes, and in Dudley, England.

Q: Was a tunnel 3.25 km long?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a tunnel less likely to collapse catastrophically should unexpected conditions be met?

A: Yes, and it can be incorporated into the final tunnel or used as a backup or emergency escape passage.

Q: Were tunnels built with no functional purpose?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a tunnel the first underwater tunnel designed for automobiles?

A: Yes.

Q: Are tunnels on a bypassed section of the Turnpike now commonly known as the Abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a tunnel thought actually to be the work of ice?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a tunnel being constructed in the city of Maastricht?

A: Yes.

Q: Are tunnels used for routing steam?

A: Yes, and chilled water, electrical power or telecommunication cables, as well as connecting buildings for convenient passage of people and equipment.

Q: Was a tunnel dug out into a very deep four-track cutting?

A: Yes, and with short tunnels in places along the cutting.

Q: Were tunnels converted to locomotive haulage?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a tunnel the Rove Tunnel in France?

A: Yes, and over 7.12 km long.

Q: Is a tunnel the longest in the world under a stretch of water?

A: Yes.

Q: Are tunnels double-deck?

A: Yes, for example the two major segments of the San Francisco–Oakland Bay Bridge are linked by a double-deck tunnel through Yerba Buena Island, the largest-diameter bored tunnel in the world.

Q: Are tunnels built for military purposes?

A: Yes, or by civilians for smuggling of weapons, contraband, or people.

Q: Was a tunnel completed between France and Italy?

A: Yes, and being the second oldest Alpine tunnel, 13.

Q: Is a tunnel split into two tunnels with a short open air cutting linking the two?

A: Yes.

Q: Were tunnels also used during the Cold War?

A: Yes, and under the Berlin Wall and elsewhere, to smuggle refugees, and for espionage.

Q: Was a tunnel completed?

A: Yes, and supplying water to New York City in the US.

Q: Was a tunnel used only for freight terminating at the Park Lane goods terminal?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a tunnel begun from both sides of Mount Kastro?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a tunnel converted to a deep cutting?

A: Yes, and open to the atmosphere, being four tracks wide.

Q: Is a tunnel 1.83 miles long?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a tunnel resealed to preserved the construction as it was designated an ancient monument?

A: Yes.

Q: Were tunnels used for stations and passenger access?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a tunnel still in excellent condition?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a tunnel being considered and also reuse by a monorail system from the proposed Liverpool Waters redevelopment of Liverpool's Central Docks has been proposed?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a tunnel opened to passengers in 1836?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a tunnel the world's oldest railway tunnel traversed by rail wagons using gravity and horse haulage?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a tunnel the longest rail tunnel in the world at 57 km and carries trains under the Swiss Alps?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a tunnel bored under the railway for the tramway?

A: Yes.

Q: Are tunnels aqueducts to supply water for consumption or for hydroelectric stations or are sewers?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a tunnel created for the first true steam locomotive?

A: Yes, and from Penydarren to Abercynon.

Q: Was a tunnel built simultaneously with the 1773 Fritchley railway tunnel?

A: Yes.

Q: Are tunnels constructed at Persepolis in Iran at the same time as the construction of its foundation in 518 BCE?

A: Yes.

Q: Are tunnels often of the cut-and-cover type?

A: Yes, while deep tunnels are excavated, often using a tunnelling shield.

Q: Are tunnels a novel approach under consideration?

A: Yes, however, no such tunnels have been constructed to date.