Tourniquet FAQs:


Q: Is a tourniquet a constricting or compressing device?

A: Yes, and specifically a bandage, used to control venous and arterial circulation to an extremity for a period of time.

Q: Were tourniquets invented by James McEwen?

A: Yes.

Q: Are tourniquets capable of calculating the proper pressure to ensure complete blood occlusion in about 30 seconds?

A: Yes.

Q: Are tourniquets used in emergency bleeding control to prevent severe blood loss from limb trauma?

A: Yes.

Q: Are tourniquets generally used as a last resort?

A: Yes, and especially in civilian applications, due to the understanding that if all blood flow below the application of an emergency tourniquet is stopped, it would subsequently kill the tissue, leading to eventual loss of the limb below application.

Q: Were tourniquets invented by James McEwen?

A: Yes, and a biomedical engineer in Vancouver, Canada.

Q: Were tourniquets used to stanch the bleeding of wounded soldiers?

A: Yes.

Q: Are tourniquets self-calibrating and self-contained?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a tourniquet usually applied when the patient is in a life-threatening state as a result of continuous bleeding?

A: Yes.

Q: Are tourniquets widespread in military applications?

A: Yes, as they have the potential to save lives during major limb trauma.

Q: Is a tourniquet currently the only tourniquet that has an automatic counting timer that requires no batteries and can be applied in 5 seconds by a person with no experience in Mass Casualty Incidents?

A: Yes, S.T.A.T. Tourniquet is designed so multiple tourniquets can be linked together to create a Torso Compression Strap for lacerations or bullet wounds.

Q: Are tourniquets widely used in orthopedic and plastic surgery?

A: Yes, as well as in intravenous regional anesthesia where they serve the additional function of preventing local anesthetic in the limb from entering general circulations.

Q: Were tourniquets narrow straps made of bronze?

A: Yes, and using only leather for comfort.

Q: Are tourniquets frequently used in orthopedic surgery while emergency tourniquets are limited to emergency situations to control blood loss?

A: Yes.