Thimble FAQs:


Q: Is a thimble a small hard pitted cup worn for protection on the finger that pushes the needle in sewing?

A: Yes.

Q: Were thimbles in use at this time also although no thimble seems to have been discovered with the needle?

A: Yes.

Q: Are thimbles usually made from metal?

A: Yes, and leather, rubber, and wood, and even glass or china.

Q: Were thimbles made from silver?

A: Yes, however, it was found that silver is too soft a metal and can be easily punctured by most needles.

Q: Were thimbles regarded as an ideal gift for ladies?

A: Yes.

Q: Are thimbles given as gifts in Peter Pan?

A: Yes, and who thinks thimbles are kisses.

Q: Were thimbles collected from "those who had nothing to give" by the British government and melted down to buy hospital equipment?

A: Yes.

Q: Were thimbles used simply solely for pushing a needle through fabric or leather as it was being sewn?

A: Yes.

Q: Were thimbles sometimes made from whale bone?

A: Yes, and horn, or ivory.

Q: Were thimbles made of brass?

A: Yes.

Q: Were thimbles used to measure spirits, and gunpowder, which brought rise to the phrase "just a thimbleful"?

A: Yes, Prostitutes used them in the practice of thimble-knocking where they would tap on a window to announce their presence.

Q: Were thimbles either cast brass or made from hammered sheet?

A: Yes.

Q: Were thimbles also given as 'keepsakes' and were usually quite unsuitable for sewing?

A: Yes.

Q: Were thimbles used for advertising?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a thimble made by hand punching?

A: Yes, but in the middle of that century, a machine was invented to do the job.

Q: Are thimbles known as digitabulists?

A: Yes.

Q: Were thimbles in widespread use there by the 14th century?

A: Yes.

Q: Are thimbles prominently featured in a number of New England Whaling Museums?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a thimble one of the eight traditional metal game pieces used to mark a player's position on the game board?

A: Yes.