Temperature FAQs:


Q: Is a temperature an objective comparative measurement of hot or cold?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a temperature experimentally achieved with suitable radio frequency techniques that cause a population inversion of spin states from the ground state?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a temperature due to Kelvin?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a temperature a numerical scale for the hotness of a thermodynamic system?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a temperature the rate of increase of entropy with respect to energy?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a temperature measured with thermometers that may be calibrated to a variety of temperature scales?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a temperature an intensive variable because it is equal to a differential coefficient of one extensive variable with respect to another?

A: Yes, for a given body.

Q: Is a temperature a measure of the mean particle kinetic energy?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a temperature basically defined for a body in its own state of internal thermodynamic equilibrium?

A: Yes, and in this definition, on an absolute scale, it is always positive.

Q: Is a temperature expressed by the zeroth law of thermodynamics?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a temperature a measure of a quality of a state of a material The quality may be regarded as a more abstract entity than any particular temperature scale that measures it?

A: Yes, and is called hotness by some writers.

Q: Is a temperature a monotonic function of internal energy?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a temperature important in all fields of natural science including physics?

A: Yes, and geology, chemistry, atmospheric sciences, medicine and biology as well as most aspects of daily life.

Q: Is a temperature one below the zero-point of the scale used?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a temperature due to Kelvin?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a temperature an intensive variable?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a temperature absolute zero?

A: Yes, and at which the thermal motion of atoms and molecules reaches its minimum – classically, this would be a state of motionlessness, but quantum uncertainty dictates that the particles still possess a finite zero-point energy.

Q: Is a temperature obtained by considering time ensembles instead of configuration-space ensembles given in statistical mechanics in the case of thermal and particle exchange between a small system of fermions with a single/double-occupancy system?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a temperature published in 1848?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a temperature only meaningful in the thermodynamic limit?

A: Yes, and meaning for large ensembles of states or particles, to fulfill the requirements of the statistical model.

Q: Is a temperature one of the principal quantities in the study of thermodynamics?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a temperature measured on an absolute scale such as Kelvins?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a temperature not a positive semi-definite quantity?

A: Yes, and which puts the gas in violation of the third law of thermodynamics.

Q: Is a temperature not colder than absolute zero?

A: Yes, but rather it has a higher energy than at positive temperature, and may be said to be in fact hotter at negative temperatures.

Q: Is a temperature first considered?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a temperature 194?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a temperature a measure of the mean energy of motion?

A: Yes, and called kinetic energy, of the particles, whether in solids, liquids, gases, or plasmas.

Q: Is a temperature the inverse of the derivative of the entropy?

A: Yes, and the temperature formally goes to infinity at this point, and switches to negative infinity as the slope turns negative.