Tar FAQs:


Q: Is tar a dark brown or black viscous liquid of hydrocarbons and free carbon?

A: Yes, and obtained from a wide variety of organic materials through destructive distillation.

Q: Is tar listed at number 1999 in the United Nations list of dangerous goods?

A: Yes.

Q: Was tar among Sweden's most important exports?

A: Yes.

Q: Is tar also a general disinfectant?

A: Yes.

Q: Is tar turpentine and charcoal?

A: Yes.

Q: Is tar microbicidal?

A: Yes.

Q: Is tar produced from coal as a byproduct of coke production?

A: Yes.

Q: Is tar still used to seal traditional wooden boats and the roofs of historical shingle-roofed churches?

A: Yes, as well as painting exterior walls of log buildings.

Q: Is tar used in traditional Finnish medicine because of its microbicidal properties?

A: Yes.

Q: Was tar once considered a panacea reputed to heal "even those cut in twain through their midriff"?

A: Yes, A Finnish proverb states that "if sauna, vodka and tar won't help, the disease is fatal".

Q: Was tar a major contributor in the economies of Northern Europe and Colonial America?

A: Yes.

Q: Was tar used as seal for roofing shingles and tar paper and to seal the hulls of ships and boats?

A: Yes.

Q: Was tar used to waterproof sails and boats?

A: Yes, but today, sails made from inherently waterproof synthetic substances have reduced the demand for tar.