Sword FAQs:


Q: Is a sword a bladed weapon intended for both cutting and thrusting?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a sword often used as a symbol of the word of God?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a sword designed to impale their targets quickly and inflict deep stab wounds?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a sword kept over the corpse?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a sword sometimes used interchangeably with side-sword?

A: Yes.

Q: Are swords of the Mameluke pattern which was adopted in 1825 in recognition of the Marines' key role in the capture of the Tripolitan city of Derna during the First Barbary War?

A: Yes.

Q: Are swords still commonly used today as weapons?

A: Yes, and often as a side arm for military infantry.

Q: Are swords often found at burial sites?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a sword used after 1625 by cavalry during the English Civil War?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a sword preferred?

A: Yes, and most wealthy men and military officers carried one slung from a belt.

Q: Were swords also used to administer various physical punishments?

A: Yes, and such as non-surgical amputation or capital punishment by decapitation.

Q: Were swords designed as cutting weapons?

A: Yes, although effective points were becoming common to counter improvements in armour, especially the 14th-century change from chain mail to plate armour.

Q: Is a sword applied to swords comparatively long for their respective periods?

A: Yes.

Q: Were swords used during the revolutions against the colonialists not only because ammunition for guns was scarce?

A: Yes, and but also for concealability while walking in crowded streets and homes.

Q: Was a sword a type of war sword used by infantry during the Renaissance of Europe?

A: Yes.

Q: Are swords commonly worn as a ceremonial item in many military and naval services throughout the world?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a sword a direct descendant of the arming sword?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a sword intended to be drawn with the blade pointing downwards ready for surprise stabbing attacks?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a sword often placed on the right side of the corpse?

A: Yes.

Q: Were swords over 6 feet long?

A: Yes, and with the one ascribed to Frisian warrior Pier Gerlofs Donia being 7 feet long.

Q: Is a sword almost parallel?

A: Yes.

Q: Were swords made alongside bronze?

A: Yes, and it was not until the early Han period that iron completely replaced bronze.

Q: Are swords less frequent?

A: Yes.

Q: Were swords still used in combat?

A: Yes, and especially in Colonial Wars between native populations and Colonial Empires.

Q: Is a sword held in very high esteem?

A: Yes.

Q: Were swords common?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a sword known as swordsmanship or as fencing?

A: Yes.

Q: Were swords exported from Europe to the Aegean, and as far afield as Ugarit, beginning about 1200 BC, i.e?

A: Yes, just a few decades before the final collapse of the palace cultures in the Bronze Age collapse.

Q: Is a sword called a kirpan?

A: Yes, and its double-edged counterpart a khanda or tega.