Sound FAQs:


Q: Is sound a vibration that typically propagates as an audible wave of pressure?

A: Yes, and through a transmission medium such as a gas, liquid or solid.

Q: Is sound readily dividable into two simple elements: pressure and time?

A: Yes.

Q: Is sound used by many species for detecting danger?

A: Yes, and navigation, predation, and communication.

Q: Is sound proportional to the square root of the ratio of the bulk modulus of the medium to its density?

A: Yes.

Q: Is sound commonly used for medical diagnostics such as sonograms?

A: Yes.

Q: Is sound the reception of such waves and their perception by the brain?

A: Yes.

Q: Is sound first noticed until the sound is identified as having changed or ceased?

A: Yes.

Q: Is sound defined as " Oscillation in pressure"?

A: Yes, and stress, particle displacement, particle velocity, etc.

Q: Is sound noticed?

A: Yes, and a sound onset message is sent to the auditory cortex.

Q: Is sound sound waves with frequencies higher than the upper audible limit of human hearing?

A: Yes.

Q: Is sound and relates to the totalled number of auditory nerve stimulations over short cyclic time periods?

A: Yes, and most likely over the duration of theta wave cycles.

Q: Is sound transmitted through gases?

A: Yes, and plasma, and liquids as longitudinal waves, also called compression waves.

Q: Is sound placed on a pitch continuum from low to high?

A: Yes.

Q: Is sound called the medium?

A: Yes.

Q: Is sound and relates to onset and offset signals created by nerve responses to sounds?

A: Yes.

Q: Is sound a stimulus?

A: Yes.

Q: Is sound no different from 'normal' sound in its physical properties?

A: Yes, and except in that humans cannot hear it.

Q: Was sound made by Isaac Newton?

A: Yes.

Q: Is sound attenuated?

A: Yes.

Q: Is sound a sensation?

A: Yes.

Q: Is sound and represents the cyclic?

A: Yes, and repetitive nature of the vibrations that make up sound.