Solenoid FAQs:


Q: Is a solenoid a type of electromagnet when the purpose is to generate a controlled magnetic field?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a solenoid a solenoid with finite length?

A: Yes.

Q: Are solenoids the uniquely designed magnetic circuits that effect analog positioning of the solenoid plunger or armature as a function of coil current?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a solenoid radially uniform?

A: Yes.

Q: Are solenoids commonly seen in electronic paintball markers?

A: Yes, and pinball machines, dot matrix printers and fuel injectors.

Q: Is a solenoid a solenoid with infinite length but finite diameter?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a solenoid activated?

A: Yes, and the core is drawn into the coil, and the disk rotates on the ball bearings in the grooves as it moves towards the coil body.

Q: Was a solenoid invented in 1944 by George H?

A: Yes, Leland, of Dayton, Ohio, to provide a more reliable and shock/vibration tolerant release mechanism for air-dropped bombs.

Q: Is a solenoid part of an automobile starting system?

A: Yes.

Q: Are solenoids also in everyday household items such as washing machines to control the flow and amount of water into the drum?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a solenoid radially uniform or constant?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a solenoid not formed by discrete finite-width coils but by infinitely many infinitely-thin coils with no space between them?

A: Yes, in this abstraction, the solenoid is often viewed as a cylindrical sheet of conductive material.

Q: Were solenoids prone to inadvertent releases?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a solenoid much greater than the volume inside?

A: Yes, so the density of magnetic field lines outside is greatly reduced.

Q: Is a solenoid constructed as a wire spiral?

A: Yes, and then it emanates an outside field the same way as a single wire, due to the current flowing overall down the length of the solenoid.

Q: Is a solenoid an electromechanical device used to rotate a ratcheting mechanism when power is applied?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a solenoid instead to impede changes in the electric current?

A: Yes, and a solenoid can be more specifically classified as an inductor rather than an electromagnet.

Q: Is a solenoid not formed by discrete coils but by a sheet of conductive material?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a solenoid actually zero?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a solenoid homogeneous and its strength does not depend on the distance from the axis?

A: Yes, nor on the solenoid cross-sectional area.