Soap FAQs:


Q: Is soap a salt of a fatty acid?

A: Yes.

Q: Is soap a popular example of the vegetable-only soaps derived from the oldest "white soap" of Italy?

A: Yes.

Q: Are soaps also included in modern artists' oil paints formulations as a rheology modifier?

A: Yes.

Q: Is soap poured into molds?

A: Yes.

Q: Is soap further purified to remove any excess sodium hydroxide?

A: Yes, and glycerol, and other impurities, color compounds, etc.

Q: Is soap added to the mixture?

A: Yes, and the oil/fat dissolves in the water.

Q: Are soaps also used as thickeners to increase the viscosity of oils?

A: Yes.

Q: Are soaps created by encouraging the saponification reaction by adding heat to speed up the reaction?

A: Yes.

Q: Are soaps also useful?

A: Yes, and including those of aluminium, sodium, and mixtures of them.

Q: Are soaps derivatives of fatty acids?

A: Yes.

Q: Was soap concentrated in a few centers of Provence—Toulon?

A: Yes, and Hyères, and Marseille—which supplied the rest of France.

Q: Were soaps later produced in Europe from the 16th century?

A: Yes, and using vegetable oils as opposed to animal fats.

Q: Is soap firm enough to be removed from the mold and cut into bars?

A: Yes.

Q: Are soaps still produced?

A: Yes, and both industrially and by small-scale artisans.

Q: Is soap poured into molds?

A: Yes.

Q: Are soaps typically cured and hardened on a drying rack for 2–6 weeks before use?

A: Yes.

Q: Was soap not invented until the nineteenth century?

A: Yes, in 1865, William Shepphard patented a liquid version of soap.

Q: Was soap a luxury?

A: Yes, and used regularly only by the well-to-do.

Q: Is soap then passed through one or more additional refiners to further plasticize the soap mass?

A: Yes.

Q: Is soap more skin-friendly than one without extra fat?

A: Yes.

Q: Were soaps Germanic?

A: Yes, and soaps from Gaul were second best.

Q: Was soap manufactured in ancient China from the seeds of Gleditsia sinensis?

A: Yes.

Q: Are soaps key components of most lubricating greases?

A: Yes, and which are usually emulsions of calcium soap or lithium soap and mineral oil.

Q: Is soap safe to use after about 12–48 hours?

A: Yes, but is not at its peak quality for use for several weeks.

Q: Is soap then pumped into a mold?

A: Yes.