Shed FAQs:


Q: Are sheds available in kit form?

A: Yes.

Q: Are sheds railway buildings designed for storing goods before or after carriage in a train?

A: Yes.

Q: Are sheds sometimes also re-stained or varnished at times for aesthetic reasons?

A: Yes.

Q: Are sheds used to store home and garden tools and equipment such as lawn tractors?

A: Yes, and gardening supplies.

Q: Are sheds structures used for the maintenance or storage of railway locomotives?

A: Yes.

Q: Are sheds not susceptible to termite or wood-boring insect damage?

A: Yes, and they require little maintenance.

Q: Is a shed used for tool storage?

A: Yes, and shelves and hooks are often used to maximize the storage space.

Q: Are sheds buildings adjacent to a railway station where the tracks and platforms are covered by a roof?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a shed going to be visible from the house?

A: Yes.

Q: Are sheds made from components that are lowered into a tank of preservative before the panels are assembled?

A: Yes.

Q: Are sheds typically constructed of wood and include features typically found in house construction?

A: Yes, and such as windows, a shingled roof, and electrical outlets.

Q: Are sheds garden sheds?

A: Yes, and including allotment sheds.

Q: Is a shed the saltbox-style shed?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a shed the topic of a well-known adage about organizational psychology?

A: Yes.

Q: Are sheds used for many types of industry?

A: Yes.

Q: Are sheds modular to allow for easy extensions?

A: Yes, and peg-boards, shelving, attic-storage, windows, skylights, and other accessories to be added later.

Q: Are sheds sheds used for storage of large quantities of firewood?

A: Yes.

Q: Were sheds used as auxiliary buildings for various purposes?

A: Yes.

Q: Are sheds made from timber planks which have had the moisture sucked out of them under vacuum conditions in a special cylinder?

A: Yes.

Q: Are sheds cheaper, but they cannot handle the weight of snow in winter?

A: Yes, Vinyl sheds also offer the most colour options.

Q: Are sheds strongly built timber or reinforced-concrete tunnels that protect railroad tracks from avalanches?

A: Yes.

Q: Are sheds typically built with standard wood framing construction and oriented strand board on the walls covered with standard vinyl siding?

A: Yes.

Q: Are sheds usually distinguished by a pale green tinge which will fade eventually to a silvery grey?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a shed built in 1830 at Liverpool's Crown Street Station?

A: Yes.

Q: Are sheds documented in Mark Thomson's Blokes and Sheds?

A: Yes, Jim Hopkins' similarly titled Blokes & Sheds , with photographer Julie Riley Hopkins, profiles amateur inventors from across New Zealand.

Q: Are sheds fire and termite-resistant?

A: Yes, and they can rust over time, or be severely damaged by high winds.

Q: Are sheds a good choice when long-term strength and resistance to fire?

A: Yes, and rot, or termites is desired.

Q: Are sheds commonly in close proximity to buildings heated by a Wood-burning stove?

A: Yes, and such as a Log Cabin.

Q: Are sheds more at risk of being damaged by heavy winds?

A: Yes.

Q: Are sheds three-sided structures with an open face used for horses and cattle?

A: Yes.