Rocket FAQs:


Q: Are rockets capable of attaining escape velocity from Earth and therefore can achieve unlimited maximum altitude?

A: Yes.

Q: Were rockets developed in the late 18th century in the Kingdom of Mysore?

A: Yes.

Q: Are rockets calculated using the drag equation?

A: Yes.

Q: Are rockets commonly used to carry instruments that take readings from 50 kilometers to 1,500 kilometers above the surface of the Eart?

A: Yes, and ommonly used to carry instruments that take readings from 50 kilometers to 1,500 kilometers above the surface of the Earth.

Q: Are rockets lightweight and powerful and capable of generating large accelerations?

A: Yes.

Q: Are rockets now used for fireworks?

A: Yes, and weaponry, ejection seats, launch vehicles for artificial satellites, human spaceflight, and space exploration.

Q: Is a rocket part of the field of ballistics?

A: Yes.

Q: Are rockets the most common type of high power rocket?

A: Yes, and typically creating a high speed exhaust by the combustion of fuel with an oxidizer.

Q: Were rockets used militarily as incendiary weapons in sieges?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a rocket travelling at high speeds, close to the Earth or other planetary surface?

A: Yes, whereas waiting until the rocket has slowed at altitude multiplies up the effort required to achieve the desired trajectory.

Q: Were rockets used to propel a line to a stricken ship so that a Breeches buoy can be used to rescue those on board?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a rocket normally propellant?

A: Yes.

Q: Are rockets chemically powered rockets that emit a hot exhaust gas?

A: Yes.

Q: Are rockets used to power jet packs?

A: Yes, and have been used to power cars and a rocket car holds the all time drag racing record.

Q: Is a rocket travelling before the burn the more orbital energy it gains or loses?

A: Yes.

Q: Are rockets burning together and then detach when they burn out?

A: Yes.

Q: Are rockets normally launched from a launch pad that provides stable support until a few seconds after ignition?

A: Yes.

Q: Were rockets developed in Song China?

A: Yes, and by the 13th century.

Q: Are rockets mainly useful when a very high speed is required?

A: Yes, such as ICBMs or orbital launch.

Q: Is a rocket close to the ground?

A: Yes, since the noise from the engines radiates up away from the jet, as well as reflecting off the ground.

Q: Are rockets the Huolongjing?

A: Yes, and written by the Chinese artillery officer Jiao Yu in the mid-14th century.

Q: Is a rocket the sum of the impulses of the individual stages?

A: Yes.

Q: Are rockets also used in some types of consumer and professional fireworks?

A: Yes.

Q: Are rockets used for?

A: Yes, and a high peak acceleration applied for just a short time is highly desirable.

Q: Are rockets rarely if ever used for general aviation?

A: Yes.

Q: Are rockets also used to launch emergency flares?

A: Yes.

Q: Were rockets also used on aircraft, either for assisting horizontal take-off , vertical take-off or for powering them?

A: Yes, The Allies' rocket programs were less sophisticated, relying mostly on unguided missiles like the Soviet Katyusha rocket.

Q: Was a rocket further improved by Edward Mounier Boxer in 1865?

A: Yes.

Q: Were rockets used to study high-altitude conditions, by radio telemetry of temperature and pressure of the atmosphere, detection of cosmic rays, and further research?

A: Yes, notably the Bell X-1, the first manned vehicle to break the sound barrier.

Q: Is a rocket a type of model rocket using water as its reaction mass?

A: Yes.

Q: Are rockets particularly useful when very high speeds are required, such as orbital speed at approximately 7,800 m/s?

A: Yes, Spacecraft delivered into orbital trajectories become artificial satellites, which are used for many commercial purposes.

Q: Is a rocket lightweight and hence performs better?

A: Yes, for essentially the same reasons that low weight is desirable in sports cars.