River FAQs:


Q: Is a river a natural flowing watercourse?

A: Yes, and usually freshwater, flowing towards an ocean, sea, lake or another river.

Q: Are rivers specific to geographic location?

A: Yes, examples are "run" in some parts of the United States, "burn" in Scotland and northeast England, and "beck" in northern England.

Q: Are rivers extensively used in construction?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a river proportional to the sixth power of the river flow speed?

A: Yes.

Q: Are rivers frequently found in regions with limestone geologic formations?

A: Yes.

Q: Are rivers similar to braided rivers and are quite rare?

A: Yes.

Q: Are rivers typically fed from chalk aquifers which recharge from winter rainfall?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a river fed by many tributaries and has more discharge than a youthful river?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a river subject to vertical erosion?

A: Yes, and deepening the valley.

Q: Are rivers often managed or controlled to make them more useful?

A: Yes, or less disruptive, to human activity.

Q: Is a river defined as being larger than a creek?

A: Yes, but not always: the language is vague.

Q: Are rivers found in regions with limited or highly variable rainfall?

A: Yes, or can occur because of geologic conditions such as a highly permeable river bed.

Q: Are rivers complex and depends on inputs from the atmosphere?

A: Yes, and the geology through which it travels and the inputs from man's activities.

Q: Are rivers characterized by flood plains?

A: Yes.

Q: Are rivers part of the hydrological cycle?

A: Yes.

Q: Are rivers called bournes and give their name to places such as Bournemouth and Eastbourne?

A: Yes.

Q: Are rivers one aspect of hydrology?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a river twelfth order?

A: Yes.

Q: Are rivers called rivière?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a river usually confined to a channel?

A: Yes, and made up of a stream bed between banks.

Q: Are rivers generally described by the river continuum concept?

A: Yes, and which has some additions and refinements to allow for dams and waterfalls and temporary extensive flooding.

Q: Are rivers now found in only a few regions worldwide?

A: Yes, such as the South Island of New Zealand.

Q: Are rivers increasingly managed for habitat conservation?

A: Yes, as they are critical for many aquatic and riparian plants, resident and migratory fishes, waterfowl, birds of prey, migrating birds, and many mammals.