Refrigerator FAQs:


Q: Is a refrigerator sometimes referred to as an icebox in American usage?

A: Yes.

Q: Are refrigerators refrigerators that work on the magnetocaloric effect?

A: Yes.

Q: Were refrigerators white?

A: Yes, but from the mid-1950s through present day designers and manufacturers put color onto refrigerators.

Q: Are refrigerators regulated, often mandating the removal of doors?

A: Yes, children playing hide-and-seek have been asphyxiated while hiding inside discarded refrigerators, particularly older models with latching doors.

Q: Are refrigerators extremely reliable because the moving parts and fluids are sealed from the atmosphere for life?

A: Yes, and with no possibility of leakage or contamination.

Q: Are refrigerators powered by electricity?

A: Yes.

Q: Are refrigerators refrigerators that use resonant linear reciprocating motors/alternators to generate a sound that is converted to heat and cold using compressed helium gas?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a refrigerator the glass fronted beverage cooler?

A: Yes.

Q: Are refrigerators designed to reduce electrical consumption?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a refrigerator invented by Baltzar von Platen and Carl Munters from Sweden in 1922?

A: Yes, while they were still students at the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm.

Q: Are refrigerators by far the most common type?

A: Yes, they make a noticeable noise.

Q: Were refrigerators introduced in 1915 and gained wider acceptance in the United States in the 1930s as prices fell and non-toxic?

A: Yes, and non-flammable synthetic refrigerants such as Freon-12 were introduced.

Q: Are refrigerators those that are 20% to 24?

A: Yes.

Q: Were refrigerators developed in the 1970s and 1980s?

A: Yes, and even though environmental issues led to the banning of very effective refrigerants.

Q: Are refrigerators designed to use electricity intermittently?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a refrigerator then refurbished?

A: Yes, and with new door seals, a thorough cleaning and the removal of items, such as the cover that is strapped to the back of many older units.

Q: Is a refrigerator measured in either liters or cubic feet?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a refrigerator above freeze point and can pass the warmer-than-freezing air through the evaporator or cold plate to aid the defrosting cycle?

A: Yes.