Pump FAQs:


Q: Is a pump a device that moves fluids?

A: Yes, or sometimes slurries, by mechanical action.

Q: Are pumps used for biochemical processes in developing and manufacturing medicine?

A: Yes, and as artificial replacements for body parts, in particular the artificial heart and penile prosthesis.

Q: Are pumps considered the most sustainable low-cost option for safe water supply in resource-poor settings?

A: Yes, and often in rural areas in developing countries.

Q: Are pumps reciprocating positive displacement pumps?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a pump therefore necessary?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a pump a more complicated type of rotary pump that uses two or three screws with opposing thread — e.g.?

A: Yes, and one screw turns clockwise and the other counterclockwise.

Q: Are pumps used throughout society for a variety of purposes?

A: Yes.

Q: Were pumps included in the survey?

A: Yes.

Q: Are pumps how they operate under closed valve conditions?

A: Yes.

Q: Are pumps intrinsically safe by design?

A: Yes, although all manufacturers offer ATEX certified models to comply with industry regulation.

Q: Was a pump developed by ETH Zurich?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a pump mainly used on surface applications where the pumped fluid may contain a considerable amount of solids such as sand and dirt?

A: Yes.

Q: Are pumps duplex or triplex cylinder?

A: Yes.

Q: Are pumps single-screw types typically used in shallow wells or at the surface?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a pump used extensively in the 19th century—in the early days of steam propulsion—as boiler feed water pumps?

A: Yes.

Q: Are pumps very efficient because they naturally remove air from the lines?

A: Yes, and eliminating the need to bleed the air from the lines manually.

Q: Are pumps drawn directly from the soil?

A: Yes, and it is more prone to contamination.

Q: Is a pump a type of positive displacement pump?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a pump constructed of two inter-meshing screws that move the pumped fluid?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a pump severely damaged?

A: Yes, or both.

Q: Are pumps no longer common?

A: Yes, and people still used the expression parish pump to describe a place or forum where matters of local interest are discussed.

Q: Are pumps installed in series rather than having just one massive pump?

A: Yes.

Q: Are pumps basically multistage centrifugal pumps and are widely used in oil well applications as a method for artificial lift?

A: Yes.

Q: Are pumps constant flow machines?

A: Yes.

Q: Are pumps compressed-air-powered double-diaphragm pumps?

A: Yes.

Q: Are pumps commonly rated by horsepower?

A: Yes, and flow rate, outlet pressure in metres of head, inlet suction in suction feet of head.

Q: Is a pump designed to be cheap to build and install?

A: Yes, and easy to maintain with simple parts.

Q: Are pumps designed to operate under changing or fluctuating process conditions?

A: Yes.

Q: Are pumps used to transport the untreated flow stream produced from oil wells to downstream processes or gathering facilities?

A: Yes.

Q: Were pumps widely used to pump water from wells?

A: Yes.

Q: Are pumps operated at high speeds?

A: Yes, and the fluids cause erosion, which eventually causes enlarged clearances that liquid can pass through, which reduces efficiency.

Q: Are pumps usually specified when the pumped fluid is mainly liquid?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a pump determined by dividing the output power by the pump efficiency?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a pump also referred to as a centrifugal pump?

A: Yes.

Q: Are pumps frequently classified as a separate type?

A: Yes, and they have essentially the same operating principles as centrifugal pumps.

Q: Are pumps often used when pumping conditions contain high gas volume fractions and fluctuating inlet conditions?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a pump used for irrigation?

A: Yes, and water supply, gasoline supply, air conditioning systems, refrigeration , chemical movement, sewage movement, flood control, marine services, etc.