Pressure FAQs:


Q: Is pressure the amount of force applied perpendicular to the surface of an object per unit area?

A: Yes.

Q: Is pressure the pressure of a vapour in thermodynamic equilibrium with its condensed phases in a closed system?

A: Yes.

Q: Is pressure often given in units with "g" appended, e.g?

A: Yes, "kPag", "barg" or "psig", and units for measurements of absolute pressure are sometimes given a suffix of "a", to avoid confusion, for example "kPaa", "psia". However, the US National Institute of Standards and Technology recommends that, to avoid confusion, any modifiers be instead applied to the quantity being measured rather than the unit of measure.

Q: Is pressure defined as a scalar quantity?

A: Yes.

Q: Is pressure called the force density?

A: Yes.

Q: Is pressure correspondingly two or three times as great for any given depth?

A: Yes.

Q: Is pressure felt acting on the person's eardrums?

A: Yes.

Q: Is pressure the pressure a fluid exerts when it is forced to stop moving?

A: Yes.

Q: Is pressure directed in such or such direction""?

A: Yes, The pressure, as a scalar, has no direction.

Q: Is pressure sometimes measured not as an absolute pressure, but relative to atmospheric pressure?

A: Yes, such measurements are called gauge pressure.

Q: Is pressure the barye?

A: Yes, and equal to 1 dyn·cm−2, or 0.1 Pa.

Q: Is pressure distributed to solid boundaries or across arbitrary sections of fluid normal to these boundaries or sections at every point?

A: Yes.

Q: Is pressure neglected, liquid pressure against the bottom is twice as great at twice the depth?

A: Yes, at three times the depth, the liquid pressure is threefold; etc.

Q: Is pressure 100 kPa, a gas at 200 kPa is 50% denser than the same gas at 100 kPa?

A: Yes, Focusing on gauge values, one might erroneously conclude the first sample had twice the density of the second one.

Q: Is pressure n't only downward?

A: Yes.

Q: Is pressure measured in millimetres of mercury in most of the world?

A: Yes, and lung pressures in centimetres of water are still common.

Q: Is pressure preferred?

A: Yes.

Q: Is pressure that it is exerted equally in all directions?

A: Yes.

Q: Are pressures the result of the ignition of explosive gases?

A: Yes, and mists, dust/air suspensions, in unconfined and confined spaces.

Q: Is pressure predominantly attributed to the discoveries of Blaise Pascal and Daniel Bernoulli?

A: Yes.

Q: Is pressure depth dependent?

A: Yes, and not volume dependent, so there is a reason that water seeks its own level.

Q: Is pressure the relevant measure of pressure wherever one is interested in the stress on storage vessels and the plumbing components of fluidics systems?

A: Yes.

Q: Is pressure a scalar quantity?

A: Yes.

Q: Is pressure seen acting sideways when water spurts sideways from a leak in the side of an upright can?

A: Yes.

Q: Is pressure a measure of potential energy stored per unit volume?

A: Yes.

Q: Is pressure used?

A: Yes.

Q: Is pressure the pascal , equal to one newton per square metre?

A: Yes, This name for the unit was added in 1971; before that, pressure in SI was expressed simply in newtons per square metre.

Q: Is pressure a scalar quantity?

A: Yes, and not a vector quantity.

Q: Is pressure most often the compressive stress at some point within a fluid?

A: Yes.

Q: Is pressure a lower-case p?

A: Yes, However, upper-case P is widely used.

Q: Is pressure the same at the bottom of each vase?

A: Yes, and regardless of its shape or volume.

Q: Is pressure expressed in units with "d" appended?

A: Yes, this type of measurement is useful when considering sealing performance or whether a valve will open or close.

Q: Is pressure sometimes expressed in grams-force or kilograms-force per square centimetre and the like without properly identifying the force units?

A: Yes.

Q: Is pressure transmitted to solid boundaries or across arbitrary sections of fluid normal to these boundaries or sections at every point?

A: Yes.

Q: Is pressure commonly measured by its ability to displace a column of liquid in a manometer, pressures are often expressed as a depth of a particular fluid?

A: Yes, The most common choices are mercury and water; water is nontoxic and readily available, while mercury's high density allows a shorter column to be used to measure a given pressure.

Q: Are pressures given in kilopascals in most other fields?

A: Yes, where the hecto- prefix is rarely used.