Plating FAQs:


Q: Is a plating a surface covering in which a metal is deposited on a conductive surface?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a plating used to decorate objects?

A: Yes, for corrosion inhibition, to improve solderability, to harden, to improve wearability, to reduce friction, to improve paint adhesion, to alter conductivity, to improve IR reflectivity, for radiation shielding, and for other purposes.

Q: Is a plating a combination of a high-nickel zinc-nickel alloy and some variation of chromate?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a plating widely used in some applications in the aerospace?

A: Yes, and military, and aviation fields.

Q: Is a plating the thin?

A: Yes, and decorative bright chrome, which is typically a 10-µm layer over an underlying nickel plate.

Q: Is a plating one of the best corrosion resistant finishes available offering over 5 times the protection of conventional zinc plating and up to 1,500 hours of neutral salt spray test performanc?

A: Yes, and ne of the best corrosion resistant finishes available offering over 5 times the protection of conventional zinc plating and up to 1,500 hours of neutral salt spray test performance.

Q: Was a plating Sheffield Plate?

A: Yes, where thin sheets of silver are fused to a layer or core of base metal, but in the 19th century new methods of production were introduced.

Q: Was a plating invented from the Spanish word for silver "plata"?

A: Yes, and seizures of silver from Spanish ships carrying silver from America being a large source of silver at the time.

Q: Is a plating non-magnetic and amorphous?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a plating occasionally used on white gold?

A: Yes, and silver or copper and its alloys.

Q: Is a plating under scrutiny because of the environmental toxicity of the cadmium metal?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a plating self-catalyzing process?

A: Yes, and the resultant nickel layer is NiP compound, with 7–11% phosphorus content.

Q: Is a plating a finishing treatment using the electrolytic deposition of chromium?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a plating an environmentally safe option?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a plating often poorly implemented?

A: Yes, and making the result inferior to similarly priced copper cables.

Q: Is a plating often used in electronics?

A: Yes, and to provide a corrosion-resistant electrically conductive layer on copper, typically in electrical connectors and printed circuit boards.

Q: Is a plating made up of about 250 g/L of CrO3 and about 2.5 g/L of SO4−?

A: Yes, In solution, the chrome exists as chromic acid, known as hexavalent chromium.

Q: Is a plating a method of depositing a thin layer of gold on the surface of glass or metal?

A: Yes, and most often copper or silver.