Pink FAQs:


Q: Is a pink a pale red color that is named after a flower of the same name?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a pink an American women's anti-globalization and anti-war group founded in 2002 by activist Medea Benjamin?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a pink also more popular with older people than younger?

A: Yes, twenty-five percent of women under twenty-five called pink their least favorite color, compared with only eight percent of women over fifty.

Q: Is a pink one of the most common colors of flowers?

A: Yes, it serves to attract the insects and birds necessary for pollination and perhaps also to deter predators.

Q: Was a pink not a common color in the fashion of the Middle Ages?

A: Yes, nobles usually preferred brighter reds, such as crimson.

Q: Are pinks the Italian designer Elsa Schiaparelli?

A: Yes, and who was aligned with the artists of the surrealist movement, including Jean Cocteau.

Q: Is a pink often associated with girls?

A: Yes, while blue is associated with boys.

Q: Is a pink used for the newsprint paper of several important newspapers devoted to business and sports?

A: Yes, and the color is also connected with the press aimed at the gay community.

Q: Is a pink the color most associated with charm?

A: Yes, and politeness, sensitivity, tenderness, sweetness, softness, childhood, the feminine, and the romantic.

Q: Was a pink the Rococo Period in the 18th century?

A: Yes, when pastel colors became very fashionable in all the courts of Europe.

Q: Was a pink particularly championed by Madame de Pompadour?

A: Yes, and the mistress of King Louis XV of France, who wore combinations of pale blue and pink, and had a particular tint of pink made for her by the Sevres porcelain factory, created by adding nuances of blue, black and yellow.

Q: Was a pink strongly associated with femininity but to an extent that was "neither rigid nor universal" as it later became?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a pink named with a compound noun 粉紅色?

A: Yes, and meaning "powder red" where the powder refers to substances used for women's make-up.

Q: Is a pink named after the flowers?

A: Yes, and pinks, flowering plants in the genus Dianthus, and derives from the frilled edge of the flowers.

Q: Is a pink also one of the few colors to be strongly associated with a particular aroma?

A: Yes, that of roses.

Q: Is a pink the color most associated with sweet foods and beverages?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a pink a symbol of marriage?

A: Yes, and showing a spiritual marriage between the mother and child.

Q: Is a pink the color most associated with Indian spiritual leader Meher Baba?

A: Yes, and who often wore pink coats to please his closest female follower, Mehera Irani, and today pink remains an important color, symbolizing love, to Baba's followers.

Q: Was a pink their least favorite color?

A: Yes, and compared with eight percent of men over fifty.

Q: Is a pink often used as a symbolic color by groups involved in issues important to women?

A: Yes, and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people.

Q: Was a pink chosen partially because it is so strongly associated with femininity?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a pink the color most often associated with charm?

A: Yes, and politeness, sensitivity, tenderness, sweetness, childhood, femininity and the romantic.

Q: Is a pink the color most commonly associated with springtime due to the blooming cherry blossoms?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a pink associated with Tuesday on the Thai solar calendar?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a pink generally considered a tint of red?

A: Yes, and the hues of most shades of pink are slightly bluish, and lie between red and magenta.

Q: Was a pink first established as a female gender signifier in the 1940s?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a pink quite evidently the color of seduction in the portraits made by George Romney of Emma?

A: Yes, and Lady Hamilton, the future mistress of Admiral Horatio Nelson, in the late 18th century, it had the completely opposite meaning in the portrait of Sarah Barrett Moulton painted by Thomas Lawrence in 1794.

Q: Was a pink the least-favorite color of seventeen percent of respondents?

A: Yes, the only color more disliked was brown, with twenty percent.

Q: Is a pink never even tested?

A: Yes, and the popular press represented the research as an indication of an innate preference by girls for pink.

Q: Was a pink mainly used for the flesh color of faces and hands?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a pink associated with childhood and softness?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a pink the favorite color of only two-percent of respondents?

A: Yes, and compared with forty-five-percent who chose blue.

Q: Was a pink traditionally the color associated with the defense?

A: Yes, while white ribbons may have been used for the prosecution.