Ounce FAQs:


Q: Is an ounce widely used as part of the United States customary and British imperial systems?

A: Yes, but the troy ounce is now only commonly used for the mass of precious metals such as gold, silver, platinum, palladium, rhodium, etc.

Q: Is an ounce therefore equal to 437?

A: Yes.

Q: Is an ounce equal to 480 grains?

A: Yes.

Q: Is an ounce still a standard unit in the United States?

A: Yes, but in the United Kingdom it is now only used informally, having ceased to be a legal unit of measure in 2000.

Q: Is an ounce sometimes referred to simply as an "ounce" in applications where its use is implicit?

A: Yes.

Q: Is an ounce equal to exactly 31?

A: Yes.

Q: Is an ounce used only to express the mass of precious metals such as gold?

A: Yes, and platinum, palladium, rhodium or silver.

Q: Is an ounce defined as exactly 28?

A: Yes.

Q: Are ounces also used to express the "weight", or more accurately the areal density, of a textile fabric in North America, Asia or the UK, as in "16 oz denim"?

A: Yes, The number refers to the weight in ounces of a given amount of fabric, either a yard of a given width, or a square yard.

Q: Is an ounce a troy ounce of 22 carat gold?

A: Yes, and 91.