Odor FAQs:


Q: Are odors also commonly called scents?

A: Yes, and which can refer to both pleasant and unpleasant odors.

Q: Is odor then referenced to a source such as sewage or apple which can then be followed by a reference to a specific chemical such as acids or gasoline?

A: Yes.

Q: Is odor traced to the sensation of an odor or the odorant itself?

A: Yes.

Q: Are odors strongly linked to memories and can evoke emotions?

A: Yes.

Q: Is odor involved in the development of infant–mother attachment and is essential to a child’s social and emotional development bringing feelings of security?

A: Yes.

Q: Is odor usually not practical?

A: Yes.

Q: Is odor impossible?

A: Yes.

Q: Is odor diluted to certain amounts to reach a detection or recognition threshold?

A: Yes.

Q: Are odors also very much dependent upon circumstance and culture?

A: Yes.

Q: Are odors involved in adaptive behaviors?

A: Yes, such as parental attachment in infants or partner choice in adults.

Q: Is odor present both in animals and humans and its intensity can be influenced by many factors?

A: Yes, Body odor has a strong genetic basis both in animals and humans, but it can be also strongly influenced by various diseases and psychological conditions.

Q: Are odors significantly more emotional and evocative than those recalled by the same cue presented visually or auditorily?

A: Yes.

Q: Are odors a growing field but is a complex and difficult one?

A: Yes.

Q: Is odor a sensory cue critical for mate selection because it is a signal of immunological health?

A: Yes.

Q: Is odor a critical element in assessing an odor?

A: Yes.

Q: Is odor influenced by MHC genes?

A: Yes, and possible explanations have been that microbial flora or volatile acids are affected by the gene, which can be detected in body odor.

Q: Are odors indicative of emotional state?

A: Yes.