Narrative FAQs:


Q: Is narrative found in all forms of human creativity?

A: Yes, and art, and entertainment, including speech, literature, theatre, music and song, comics, journalism, film, television and video, radio, gameplay, unstructured recreation, and performance in general, as well as some painting, sculpture, drawing, photography, and other visual arts , as long as a sequence of events is presented.

Q: Is narrative an alternative form of explanation to that associated with natural science?

A: Yes.

Q: Are narratives a way for a person affected by an illness to make sense of his or her experiences?

A: Yes.

Q: Is narrative being narrowly defined as fiction-writing mode in which the narrator is communicating directly to the reader?

A: Yes.

Q: Is narrative often used in case study research in the social sciences?

A: Yes.

Q: Are narratives considered by the Canadian M├ętis community?

A: Yes, and to help children understand that the world around them is interconnected to their lives and communities.

Q: Are narratives often more interesting and useful for both social theory and social policy than other forms of social inquiry?

A: Yes.

Q: Are narratives devised in order to describe and compare the structures of action-driven sequential events?

A: Yes.

Q: Are narratives so powerful and why many of the classics in the humanities and social sciences are written in the narrative format?

A: Yes.

Q: Is narrative a semiotic enterprise that can enrich musical analysis?

A: Yes.

Q: Is narrative a highly aesthetic art?

A: Yes.

Q: Are narratives used to guide them on proper behavior?

A: Yes, and cultural history, formation of a communal identity, and values, as especially studied in anthropology today among traditional indigenous peoples.