Month FAQs:


Q: Is a month a unit of time, used with calendars, which is approximately as long as a natural period related to the motion of the Moon?

A: Yes, month and Moon are cognates.

Q: Is a month defined as the Moon's orbital period in a non-rotating frame of reference?

A: Yes, It is about 27.

Q: Is a month the period in which the Moon returns to the same node of its orbit?

A: Yes, the nodes are the two points where the Moon's orbit crosses the plane of the Earth's orbit.

Q: Were months divided into 3 "weeks" of ten days each?

A: Yes.

Q: Are months probably those as written in the Northumbrian dialect of Old English which he was familiar with?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a month shorter than a sidereal month because the nodes move in the opposite direction as the Moon is orbiting the Earth?

A: Yes, and one revolution in 18.

Q: Are months named after the attributes of God?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a month the most familiar lunar cycle?

A: Yes, and defined as the time interval between two consecutive occurrences of a particular phase as seen by an observer on Earth.

Q: Were months attested by Bede in his works On Chronology and The Reckoning of Time written in the 8th century?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a month 29?

A: Yes.

Q: Are months mainly of significance in astronomy?

A: Yes, and most of them first recognized in Babylonian lunar astronomy.

Q: Is a month repeated every two or three years?

A: Yes, and making 13 months instead of 12.

Q: Were months so named after the moon?

A: Yes, the new moon marking the end of an old month and start of a new month; the full moon occurring in the middle of the month, after which the month was named.

Q: Is a month longer than a sidereal month because the perigee moves in the same direction as the Moon is orbiting the Earth?

A: Yes, and one revolution in nine years.

Q: Is a month about 27?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a month the average time for the Moon to pass twice through the same equinox point of the sky?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a month Vesak?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a month the average time the Moon takes to go from perigee to perigee - the point in the Moon's orbit when it is closest to Earth?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a month longer than a sidereal month because the Earth-Moon system is orbiting the Sun in the same direction as the Moon is orbiting the Earth?

A: Yes.