Mirror FAQs:


Q: Is a mirror an object that reflects light in such a way that?

A: Yes, for incident light in some range of wavelengths, the reflected light preserves many or most of the detailed physical characteristics of the original light.

Q: Were mirrors described and studied in classical antiquity by the mathematician Diocles in his work On Burning Mirrors?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a mirror a surface with a very high degree of flatness?

A: Yes, and a surface roughness smaller than the wavelength of the light.

Q: Are mirrors widely used in and on vehicles?

A: Yes, and to allow drivers to see other vehicles coming up behind them.

Q: Is a mirror removed from the vacuum?

A: Yes, because the coating otherwise begins to corrode as soon as it is exposed to oxygen and humidity in the air.

Q: Were mirrors being produced in Moorish Spain?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a mirror manufactured by coating silver and two layers of protective paint on the back surface of glass?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a mirror the plane mirror?

A: Yes, and which has a flat screen surface.

Q: Were mirrors manufactured from around 2000 BC?

A: Yes, and some of the earliest bronze and copper examples being produced by the Qijia culture.

Q: Are mirrors integral parts of a solar power plant?

A: Yes.

Q: Are mirrors commonly used as aids to personal grooming?

A: Yes.

Q: Were mirrors made by blowing a glass bubble?

A: Yes, and then cutting off a small, circular section, producing mirrors that were either concave or convex.

Q: Are mirrors also used in scientific apparatus such as telescopes and lasers?

A: Yes, and cameras, and industrial machinery.

Q: Is a mirror the opposite?

A: Yes, and the coating preferentially reflects infrared.

Q: Are mirrors employed in kaleidoscopes?

A: Yes, and personal entertainment devices invented in Scotland by Sir David Brewster.

Q: Is a mirror very clear?

A: Yes, and light transmissive, smooth, and reflects accurate natural colors.

Q: Are mirrors designed for visible light?

A: Yes, however, mirrors designed for other wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation are also used.

Q: Are mirrors a popular design theme in architecture?

A: Yes, and particularly with late modern and post-modernist high-rise buildings in major cities.

Q: Are mirrors also commonly used by mechanics to allow vision in tight spaces and around corners in equipment?

A: Yes.

Q: Are mirrors a horror film about haunted mirrors that reflect different scenes than those in front of them?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a mirror produced by coating a silver?

A: Yes, and copper film and two or more layers of waterproof paint on the back surface of float glass, which perfectly resists acid and moisture.

Q: Are mirrors usually handcrafted?

A: Yes.

Q: Were mirrors typically small?

A: Yes, and from only a fraction of an inch to as much as eight inches in diameter.

Q: Is a mirror produced using inorganic color ink that prints patterns through a special screen onto glass?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a mirror due to the way human beings turn their bodies?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a mirror made by adhering a special protective film to the back surface of a silver glass mirror?

A: Yes, and which prevents injuries in case the mirror is broken.

Q: Are mirrors often used in lasers?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a mirror an art in which the face of the bronze mirror projects the same image that was cast on its back?

A: Yes.

Q: Were mirrors also described by the physicist Ibn Sahl in the 10th century?

A: Yes, and Ibn al-Haytham discussed concave and convex mirrors in both cylindrical and spherical geometries, carried out a number of experiments with mirrors, and solved the problem of finding the point on a convex mirror at which a ray coming from one point is reflected to another point.

Q: Are mirrors said by the Roman scholar Pliny the Elder to have been invented in Sidon in the first century AD?

A: Yes, although no archeological evidence of them date from before the third century.

Q: Are mirrors passive devices used to reflect and perhaps to focus sound waves?

A: Yes.

Q: Were mirrors very thin?

A: Yes, and thus very fragile, because the glass needed to be extremely thin to prevent cracking when coated with a hot, molten metal.

Q: Are mirrors a core element of many of the largest high-definition televisions and video projectors?

A: Yes.

Q: Are mirrors used in rear projection televisions?

A: Yes.

Q: Are mirrors used for remote probing of the atmosphere?

A: Yes, they can be used to form a narrow diffraction-limited beam.

Q: Is a mirror durable and more moisture resistant than ordinary printed glass and can serve for over 20 years?

A: Yes.

Q: Are mirrors due to the difficulties in making glass that was very clear?

A: Yes, as most ancient glass was tinted green with iron.

Q: Are mirrors also used?

A: Yes, and to produce magnified or diminished images or focus light or simply distort the reflected image.

Q: Are mirrors devices which reflect matter waves?

A: Yes.

Q: Are mirrors available and are often included in military survival kits?

A: Yes.

Q: Are mirrors often produced by the wet deposition of silver directly onto the glass substrate?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a mirror made by using a transparent substrate and choosing a coating material that is more reflective to visible light and more transmissive to infrared light?

A: Yes.

Q: Are mirrors manufactured by applying a reflective coating to a suitable substrate?

A: Yes.

Q: Are mirrors works of art and can bring color and texture to an otherwise hard?

A: Yes, and cold reflective surface.

Q: Are mirrors mirrors that provide a non-reversed image of their subjects?

A: Yes.

Q: Were mirrors used for selective detection of sound waves?

A: Yes, and especially during World War II.

Q: Are mirrors used also in some schools of feng shui?

A: Yes, and an ancient Chinese practice of placement and arrangement of space, to achieve harmony with the environment.

Q: Are mirrors often used in magic to create an illusion?

A: Yes.

Q: Are mirrors dielectric mirrors that reflect the entire visible light spectrum?

A: Yes, while efficiently transmitting infrared wavelengths.

Q: Are mirrors mirrors that amplify the light they reflect?

A: Yes.

Q: Were mirrors limited in size to a maximum area of around 40 inches square?

A: Yes, until modern glass panes began to be produced during the Industrial Revolution.

Q: Are mirrors often used?

A: Yes.

Q: Were mirrors installed to reflect sunlight into the town square in the Norwegian town of Rjukan?

A: Yes.

Q: Are mirrors made from a single?

A: Yes, and bulk material such as polished metal.

Q: Is a mirror used for furniture?

A: Yes, and doors, glass walls, commercial shelves, or public areas.

Q: Is a mirror an ordinary mirror?

A: Yes, and coated on its back surface with silver, which produces images by reflection.

Q: Are mirrors used to cast moving spots of light around a dance floor?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a mirror credited to German chemist Justus von Liebig in 1835?

A: Yes.

Q: Were mirrors made of solid metal and were too expensive for widespread use by common people?

A: Yes, they were also prone to corrosion.

Q: Are mirrors used to produce unusual reflections of the visitor?

A: Yes.

Q: Are mirrors sometimes replicated by contemporary artisans for use in interior design?

A: Yes.

Q: Were mirrors pieces of polished stone such as obsidian?

A: Yes, and a naturally occurring volcanic glass.

Q: Are mirrors commonly coated with silicon dioxide or magnesium fluoride?

A: Yes.

Q: Are mirrors designed to reflect visible light, surfaces reflecting other forms of electromagnetic radiation are also called "mirrors"?

A: Yes, The mirrors for other ranges of electromagnetic waves are used in optics and astronomy.

Q: Are mirrors commonly used for personal grooming or admiring oneself?

A: Yes, and decoration, and architecture.

Q: Is a mirror made of a float glass manufactured using vacuum coating, i.e?

A: Yes, aluminium powder is evaporated onto the exposed surface of the glass in a vacuum chamber and then coated with two or more layers of waterproof protective paint.