Milk FAQs:


Q: Is milk a pale liquid produced by the mammary glands of mammals?

A: Yes.

Q: Is milk firstly homogenized and then is heated to 138 degrees Celsius for 1–3 seconds?

A: Yes.

Q: Was milk used in the 1870s?

A: Yes.

Q: Is milk unhomogenized?

A: Yes.

Q: Is milk living white blood cells?

A: Yes, and mammary gland cells, various bacteria, and a large number of active enzymes.

Q: Is milk supplied in 1000 mL plastic bottles and delivered from factories to cities for selling?

A: Yes.

Q: Is milk distributed in metal cans?

A: Yes, and 250 and 125 mL paper containers and 100 and 200 mL squeeze tubes, and powdered milk is distributed in boxes or bags.

Q: Is milk usually bought or delivered in plastic bags or cartons via shops or supermarkets?

A: Yes.

Q: Is milk destroyed?

A: Yes, and unlike when the milk is just pasteurised.

Q: Is milk consumed regularly?

A: Yes.

Q: Is milk powdered milk?

A: Yes, and which is produced from milk by removing almost all water.

Q: Was milk therefore converted to curd?

A: Yes, and cheese and other products to reduce the levels of lactose.

Q: Is milk home delivered?

A: Yes, and daily, by local milkmen carrying bulk quantities in a metal container, usually on a bicycle.

Q: Is milk fed to infants through breastfeeding?

A: Yes, and either directly or by expressing the milk to be stored and consumed later.

Q: Was milk called the "virtuous white liquor" because alcoholic beverages were more safe to consume than water?

A: Yes.

Q: Was milk the most highly organized and integrated of any food product?

A: Yes.

Q: Is milk hardly ever sold in glass bottles in UK shops?

A: Yes.

Q: Is milk poured?

A: Yes.

Q: Is milk pasteurized by heating briefly and then refrigerated to allow transport from factory farms to local markets?

A: Yes.

Q: Is milk effective at promoting muscle growth?

A: Yes.

Q: Is milk left standing for a while, it turns "sour"?

A: Yes, This is the result of fermentation, where lactic acid bacteria ferment the lactose in the milk into lactic acid.

Q: Is milk a slightly sweeter taste due to the generation of glucose by lactose cleavage?

A: Yes.

Q: Is milk immediately cooled down and packed into a sterile container?

A: Yes.

Q: Was milk formulated to contain differing amounts of fat during the 1950s?

A: Yes.

Q: Is milk used to make yogurt?

A: Yes, and cheese, ice milk, pudding, hot chocolate and french toast.

Q: Is milk poured?

A: Yes.

Q: Is milk prohibited?

A: Yes.

Q: Was milk used to describe a cheap and very poisonous alcoholic drink made from methylated spirits mixed with water?

A: Yes.

Q: Was milk limited to children as adults did not produce lactase?

A: Yes, and an enzyme necessary for digesting the lactose in milk.

Q: Is milk not produced or distributed industrially or commercially?

A: Yes, however, human milk banks collect donated human breastmilk and redistribute it to infants who may benefit from human milk for various reasons but who cannot breastfeed.

Q: Is milk used to prepare espresso-based drinks such as cafe latte?

A: Yes.

Q: Is milk still being delivered by milkmen?

A: Yes, but by 2006 only 637 million liters was delivered by some 9,500 milkmen.

Q: Is milk often served in coffee and tea?

A: Yes.

Q: Is milk produced on an industrial scale and is by far the most commonly consumed form of milk?

A: Yes.

Q: Is milk packed in 1 or 2 liter paper containers with a sealed plastic spout?

A: Yes.

Q: Is milk a good source of many other vitamins?

A: Yes.

Q: Is milk collected and chilled prior to being transferred to urban dairies?

A: Yes, and are a good example of where farmers have been able to work on a cooperative basis, particularly in countries such as India.

Q: Is milk pumped at high pressures through very narrow tubes?

A: Yes, and breaking up the fat globules through turbulence and cavitation.

Q: Is milk sometimes substituted for breast milk?

A: Yes.

Q: Is milk deemed non-consumable due to unpleasant taste and an increased risk of food poisoning?

A: Yes.

Q: Is milk an emulsion or colloid of butterfat globules within a water-based fluid that contains dissolved carbohydrates and protein aggregates with minerals?

A: Yes.

Q: Is milk now available in a variety of sizes in cardboard cartons and plastic bottles?

A: Yes, A significant addition to the marketplace has been "long-life" milk , generally available in 1 and 2 liter rectangular cardboard cartons.

Q: Is milk almost always sold in jugs?

A: Yes, while half gallons and quarts may be found in both paper cartons and plastic jugs, and smaller sizes are almost always in cartons.

Q: Is milk more popular?

A: Yes.

Q: Is milk often added to dry breakfast cereal?

A: Yes, and porridge and granola.

Q: Is milk mostly sold in aseptic cartons?

A: Yes, and non-UHT in 1 L plastic bags or plastic bottles.

Q: Is milk sold in most convenience stores in waxed cardboard containers?

A: Yes.

Q: Is milk often buffalo milk?

A: Yes.

Q: Was milk generally distributed in 1 pint glass bottles?

A: Yes.

Q: Is milk supplied in jugs?

A: Yes.

Q: Is milk also used for white colored?

A: Yes, and non-animal beverages resembling milk in color and texture such as soy milk, rice milk, almond milk, and coconut milk.

Q: Is milk processed into a variety of dairy products such as cream?

A: Yes, and butter, yogurt, kefir, ice cream, and cheese.

Q: Is milk "casein micelles": aggregates of several thousand protein molecules with superficial resemblance to a surfactant micelle?

A: Yes, and bonded with the help of nanometer-scale particles of calcium phosphate.

Q: Was milk distributed at morning recess in 1/3 pint bottles?

A: Yes.

Q: Is milk a drink popular with students of all ages and is often sold in small plastic bags complete with straw?

A: Yes.

Q: Is milk most commonly sold in 1 liter waxed cardboard boxes and 1 liter plastic bags?

A: Yes.

Q: Is milk sold at supermarkets in either aseptic cartons or HDPE bottles?

A: Yes.

Q: Is milk extracted from non-human mammals during or soon after pregnancy?

A: Yes.

Q: Is milk stored in plastic bottles or gourds?

A: Yes.