Linguistics FAQs:


Q: Are linguistics the scientific study of language?

A: Yes, and specifically of language form, language meaning, and language in context.

Q: Are linguistics the study of the structures in the human brain that underlie grammar and communication?

A: Yes.

Q: Are linguistics the study of how language is shaped by social factors?

A: Yes.

Q: Are linguistics dominated by the generativist school?

A: Yes.

Q: Are linguistics the study of the development of linguistic ability in individuals?

A: Yes, and particularly the acquisition of language in childhood.

Q: Are linguistics the study of linguistic issues in a way that is 'computationally responsible'?

A: Yes, and i.e., taking careful note of computational consideration of algorithmic specification and computational complexity, so that the linguistic theories devised can be shown to exhibit certain desirable computational properties and their implementations.

Q: Are linguistics literary studies?

A: Yes, and discourse analysis, text linguistics, and philosophy of language.

Q: Are linguistics non-modularist and functionalist in character?

A: Yes.

Q: Are linguistics informed by models in psycholinguistics and theoretical linguistics?

A: Yes, and is focused on investigating how the brain can implement the processes that theoretical and psycholinguistics propose are necessary in producing and comprehending language.

Q: Are linguistics the interdisciplinary study of the emergence of the language faculty through human evolution?

A: Yes, and also the application of evolutionary theory to the study of cultural evolution among different languages.

Q: Are linguistics the study of the biology and evolution of language?

A: Yes.

Q: Are linguistics primarily descriptive?

A: Yes.

Q: Are linguistics the application of linguistic theory to the fields of Speech-Language Pathology?

A: Yes.

Q: Are linguistics the application of linguistic analysis to forensics?

A: Yes.

Q: Are linguistics among the first sub-disciplines to emerge in linguistics?

A: Yes, and was the most widely practised form of linguistics in the late 19th century.

Q: Are linguistics sometimes considered to be a functional approach?

A: Yes, but it differs from other functional approaches in that it is primarily concerned with how the mind creates meaning through language, and not with the use of language as a tool of communication.