Lake FAQs:


Q: Is a lake an area filled with water?

A: Yes, and localized in a basin, that is surrounded by land, apart from any river or other outlet that serves to feed or drain the lake.

Q: Are lakes bodies of water that have been excessively enriched with nutrients?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a lake Lake Titicaca in Peru and Bolivia at 3,812 m?

A: Yes, It is also the largest lake in South America.

Q: Are lakes lakes created by the direct action of glaciers and continental ice sheets?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a lake the Dead Sea?

A: Yes, and bordering Israel and Jordan at 418 metres below sea level.

Q: Is a lake Lake Baikal, followed by Lake Tanganyika?

A: Yes, Lake Maracaibo is considered by some to be the second-oldest lake on Earth, but since it lies at sea level and nowadays is a contiguous body of water with the sea, others consider that it has turned into a small bay.

Q: Are lakes lakes that occupy either local depressions, e.g?

A: Yes, craters and maars or larger basins, e.g. calderas, created by volcanism.

Q: Are lakes relict landforms indicative of arid paleoclimates?

A: Yes.

Q: Are lakes divided into amictic lakes?

A: Yes, and cold monomictic lakes, dimictic lakes, warm monomictic lakes, polymictic lakes, and oligomictic lakes.

Q: Are lakes found in endorheic basins or along the courses of mature rivers?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a lake a lake that has water in its basin throughout the year and is not subject to extreme fluctuations in level?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a lake a lake which has drastically decreased in size over geological time?

A: Yes.

Q: Are lakes artificial and are constructed for hydro-electric power generation?

A: Yes, and aesthetic purposes, recreational purposes, industrial use, agricultural use or domestic water supply.

Q: Are lakes generally found in mountainous areas?

A: Yes, and rift zones, and areas with ongoing glaciation.

Q: Are lakes formed in volcanic craters and calderas?

A: Yes, and which fill up with precipitation more rapidly than they empty via either evaporation, groundwater discharge, or combination of both.

Q: Is a lake Lake Winnipeg and Lake Winnipegosis?

A: Yes.

Q: Are lakes generally lakes created by blockage of estuaries or by the uneven accretion of beach ridges by longshore and other currents?

A: Yes.

Q: Are lakes lakes produced by wind action?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a lake called a pond?

A: Yes, and whereas in Wisconsin, almost every pond is called a lake.

Q: Are lakes created when either rivers or streams are dammed by lava flows or volcanic lahars?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a lake a large volume of molten lava?

A: Yes, and usually basaltic, contained in a volcanic vent, crater, or broad depression.

Q: Are lakes of little use to humans and have a poor ecosystem due to decreased dissolved oxygen?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a lake in quasi-technical fact?

A: Yes, and ponds.

Q: Are lakes of scientific and economic importance?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a lake a lake which has layers of water which do not intermix?

A: Yes.

Q: Are lakes bodies of liquid ethane and methane that occupy depressions on the surface of Titan?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a lake a lake which is no longer in existence?

A: Yes.

Q: Are lakes informally classified and named according to the seasonal variation in their lake level and volume?

A: Yes.

Q: Are lakes common in mountainous regions?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a lake a lake that has a uniform temperature and density from top to bottom at a specific time during the year?

A: Yes.

Q: Are lakes lakes created by the action of plants and animals?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a lake a short-lived lake or pond?

A: Yes.

Q: Are lakes classified as either holomictic lakes or meromictic lakes?

A: Yes.

Q: Are lakes important either for the thick deposits of oil shale and shale gas that they contain or as source rocks of petroleum and natural gas?

A: Yes.

Q: Are lakes fed and drained by rivers and streams?

A: Yes.

Q: Are lakes highly stratified lakes in which a layer of freshwater?

A: Yes, and derived from ice and snow melt, is dammed behind an ice shelf that is attached to the coastline.

Q: Are lakes enriched with nutrients?

A: Yes, and resulting in good plant growth and possible algal blooms.

Q: Are lakes Lonar crater lake?

A: Yes, and India, Lake Elgygytgyn, and Pingualuit crater lake, Quebec, Canada, As in case of Lake El'gygytgyn and Pingualuit crater lake, meteorite lakes can contain unique and scientifically valuable sedimentary deposits aasociated with long records of paleoclimatic changes.

Q: Is a lake controlled by the difference between the input and output compared to the total volume of the lake?

A: Yes.

Q: Are lakes said to be oligotrophic and are generally clear?

A: Yes, and having a low concentration of plant life.

Q: Are lakes often informally derived from either from their morphology of other aspects or their physical characteristics?

A: Yes.

Q: Are lakes artificial and are constructed for industrial or agricultural use?

A: Yes, for hydro-electric power generation or domestic water supply, or for aesthetic or recreational purposes or even for other activities.

Q: Is a lake a popular name for an ephemeral lake that contains water only intermediately at irregular and infrequent intervals?

A: Yes.

Q: Are lakes the numerous lakes in the world?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a lake Quake Lake?

A: Yes, and which formed as a result of the 1959 Hebgen Lake earthquake.

Q: Are lakes excluded this classification system?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a lake Lake Cerknica in Slovenia or Lag Prau Pulte in Graubünden?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a lake a lake occupying a basin formed by surface dissolution of bedrock?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a lake a body of water of 2 hectares or more in area?

A: Yes, however, others have defined lakes as waterbodies of 5 hectares and above, or 8 hectares and above. Charles Elton, one of the founders of ecology, regarded lakes as waterbodies of 40 hectares or more.

Q: Are lakes non-meromictic lakes?

A: Yes.

Q: Are lakes greatly outnumbered by ponds: of an estimated 304 million standing water bodies worldwide, 91% are 1 hectare or less in area?

A: Yes, Small lakes are also much more numerous than large lakes: in terms of area, one-third of the world's standing water is represented by lakes and ponds of 10 hectares or less.

Q: Are lakes lakes created by the blockage of a valley by either mudflows?

A: Yes, and rockslides, or screes.

Q: Is a lake a lake that has a pH is below neutral?

A: Yes, A lake is considered to and highly acid when the pH drops below 5.5, below which when biological consequences occur.

Q: Are lakes lakes produced by running water?

A: Yes.

Q: Are lakes abundant in the karst regions at the Dalmatian coast of Croatia and within large parts of Florida?

A: Yes.

Q: Are lakes a common feature of the Basin and Range area of southwestern North America?

A: Yes.

Q: Are lakes only the result of above-average precipitation in a closed?

A: Yes, or endorheic basin, usually filling dry lake beds.

Q: Are lakes lakes formed by the deformation and resulting lateral and vertical movements of the Earth’s crust?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a lake also used to describe a feature such as Lake Eyre?

A: Yes, and which is a dry basin most of the time but may become filled under seasonal conditions of heavy rainfall.

Q: Is a lake a typically shallow?

A: Yes, and intermittent lake that covers or occupies a playa either in wet seasons or in especially wet years but subsequently drying up in an arid or semiarid region.

Q: Are lakes temporary over geologic time scales?

A: Yes, as they will slowly fill in with sediments or spill out of the basin containing them.

Q: Is a lake a crescent-shaped lake called an oxbow lake due to the distinctive curved shape?

A: Yes.

Q: Are lakes also informally classified and named according to the general chemistry of their water mass?

A: Yes.

Q: Are lakes artificially created lakes formed by human activity?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a lake Manitoulin Island in Lake Huron, with a surface area of 2,766 square kilometres?

A: Yes, Lake Manitou, on Manitoulin Island, is the largest lake on an island in a lake.

Q: Is a lake not always the result of variation to density because of thermal gradients?

A: Yes.