Judge FAQs:


Q: Is a judge a person who presides over court proceedings?

A: Yes, and either alone or as a part of a panel of judges.

Q: Are judges not legally trained?

A: Yes, but unlike jurors, lay judges are usually volunteers and may be politically appointed.

Q: Are judges $101,690 per annum?

A: Yes, and federal judges earn $205,100-$263,300 per annum.

Q: Were judges known as district justices and addressed as Your Worship?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a judge a County Court Judge?

A: Yes, and they are addressed and titled the same way as a Circuit Judge is in England and Wales.

Q: Are judges often appointed from experienced attorneys?

A: Yes.

Q: Were judges addressed?

A: Yes, and in Cantonese, as Fat Goon Dai Yan before the transfer of sovereignty from the United Kingdom to China, and as Fat Goon Gok Ha since 1997.

Q: Are judges addressed as My Lord or My Lady and referred to as Your Lordship or Your Ladyship?

A: Yes, and following the English tradition.

Q: Is a judge supposed to conduct the trial impartially and?

A: Yes, and typically, in an open court.

Q: Is a judge required to be legally educated?

A: Yes, in the U.S., this generally requires a degree of Juris Doctor.

Q: Is a judge to settle a legal dispute in a final and public manner?

A: Yes, and thus affirm the rule of law.

Q: Is a judge expected to apply the law directly, as in the French expression Le juge est la bouche de la loi?

A: Yes, Furthermore, in some system even investigation may be conducted by the judge, functioning as an examining magistrate.

Q: Are judges often appointed by the head of state?

A: Yes.

Q: Are judges called Justices of the Supreme Court?

A: Yes.

Q: Are judges titled oikeusneuvos and the court is led by a presidentti?

A: Yes.

Q: Are judges required to have good moral character, i.e?

A: Yes, there must be no history of crime.

Q: Is a judge addressed as "Your Honor" or "Judge" when presiding over the court?

A: Yes.

Q: Are judges referred to as Monsieur le juge or Madame le juge?

A: Yes.

Q: Are judges referred to as "His/Her Honour Judge N." In writing?

A: Yes, and this title is occasionally abbreviated as "HHJ" or "HH Judge N", but not in legal writing.

Q: Are judges now reserved for ceremonial occasions?

A: Yes, although it was part of the standard attire in previous centuries.

Q: Are judges addressed the same way as those in England and Wales?

A: Yes.

Q: Are judges never referred to as "My Lord" or "My Lady," but only as "Your Honour" at the Ontario Superior Court of Justic?

A: Yes, and ever referred to as "My Lord" or "My Lady," but only as "Your Honour" at the Ontario Superior Court of Justice.

Q: Are judges addressed as sir?

A: Yes, and madam or the Urdu equivalent Janab.

Q: Are judges addressed as Monsieur l'Assesseur or Madame l'Assesseur?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a judge named Shofet, the judges of all courts are addressed as Sir or Madam or Your Honor?

A: Yes, Much of the time after every naming you will hear "HaShofet", meaning "the judge" after the respective address.

Q: Are judges often assisted by law clerks?

A: Yes, and referendaries and notaries in legal cases and by bailiffs or similar with security.

Q: Are judges elected in a political election?

A: Yes.