Jig FAQs:


Q: Were jigs originally in duple compound metre?

A: Yes, and , but have been adapted to a variety of time signatures, by which they are often classified into groups, including light jigs, slip jigs, single jigs, double jigs, and treble jigs.

Q: Was a jig probably derived from the French giguer?

A: Yes, and meaning 'to jump' or the Italian giga.

Q: Are jigs performed at a speed of 113 at feiseanna?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a jig the second-fastest of all the jigs?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a jig the name adopted for a form of step dancing developed by enslaved African-Americans and later adopted by minstrel show performers?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a jig the "sand jig," performed as a series of shuffles and slides on a sand-strewn stag?

A: Yes, and he "sand jig," performed as a series of shuffles and slides on a sand-strewn stage.

Q: Is a jig second in popularity only to the reel in traditional Irish dance?

A: Yes, it is popular but somewhat less common in Scottish country dance music.

Q: Are jigs the fastest of all jigs next to light jigs?

A: Yes, but the term hop jig causes some confusion, as some people use it for a single jig, while others use this term to refer to a tune in 98 time.

Q: Are jigs performed at feiseanna: the traditional and non-traditional treble jigs?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a jig now most often associated with these countries?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a jig three eighth notes twice per 68 bar?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a jig two eight-bar parts?

A: Yes, and performing two different steps, each once on the right foot, and one on the left foot.

Q: Are jigs in 98 time?

A: Yes.