Highway FAQs:


Q: Is a highway any public road or other public way on land?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a highway defined in English common law by a number of similarly-worded definitions such as "a way over which all members of the public have the right to pass and repass without hindrance" usually accompanied by "at all times"?

A: Yes, ownership of the ground is for most purposes irrelevant thus the term encompasses all such ways from the widest trunk roads in public ownership to the narrowest footpath providing unlimited pedestrian access over private land.

Q: Are highways created through existing communities?

A: Yes, and there can be reduced community cohesion and more difficult local access.

Q: Are highways often named and numbered by the governments that typically develop and maintain them?

A: Yes.

Q: Are highways set up with bus lanes to solve the traffic congestion?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a highway itself no longer a statutory expression in Scots law but remains in common law?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a highway modified in various legislation for a number of purposes but only for the specific matters dealt with in each such piece of legislation?

A: Yes.

Q: Were highways used by people on foot or on horses?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a highway discontinuous because there is a significant gap in it in southeastern Panama?

A: Yes, where the rainfall is immense and the terrain is entirely unsuitable for highway construction.

Q: Are highways extended linear sources of pollution?

A: Yes.