Gear FAQs:


Q: Are gears that the teeth of a gear prevent slippage?

A: Yes.

Q: Is gear 40 mm and the number of teeth 20?

A: Yes, and the module is 2, which means that there are 2 mm of pitch diameter for each tooth.

Q: Are gears a resultant thrust along the axis of the gear?

A: Yes, and which must be accommodated by appropriate thrust bearings, and a greater degree of sliding friction between the meshing teeth—often addressed with additives in the lubricant.

Q: Was gear not initially favoured by conservative clock makers?

A: Yes.

Q: Are gears designed for special purposes?

A: Yes.

Q: Is gear modified to achieve more intimate contact by making both gears partially envelop each other?

A: Yes.

Q: Is gear optimized to transmit torque to another engaged member with minimum noise and wear and maximum efficiency?

A: Yes, and a non-circular gear's main objective might be ratio variations, axle displacement oscillations and more.

Q: Is gear curved?

A: Yes, and this angling makes the tooth shape a segment of a helix.

Q: Were gears frequently inspected by a method that produced a paper "gear tape" record showing variations with a resolution of .0001 inches as the gear was rotated?

A: Yes.

Q: Are gears a particular form of bevel gear whose teeth project at right angles to the plane of the wheel?

A: Yes, in their orientation the teeth resemble the points on a crown.

Q: Are gears shorter?

A: Yes, so cheaper gears may be used, which tend to generate more noise due to smaller overlap ratio and a lower mesh stiffness etc.

Q: Are gears also dependent on the tooth profile?

A: Yes.

Q: Is gear one with the pitch angle exceeding 90 degrees?

A: Yes.

Q: Is gear the same?

A: Yes.

Q: Are gears sometimes seen meshing with spur gears?

A: Yes.

Q: Are gears excellent at moderate speeds but tend to be noisy at high speeds?

A: Yes.

Q: Are gears unequal?

A: Yes.

Q: Are gears more expensive to manufacture and their lubrication requirements may impose a higher operating cost per hour?

A: Yes.

Q: Are gears done when they leave the mold?

A: Yes, but powdered metal gears require sintering and sand castings or investment castings require gear cutting or other machining to finish them.

Q: Are gears almost always designed to operate with shafts at 90 degrees?

A: Yes.

Q: Is gear zero when the gears are aligned correctly?

A: Yes.

Q: Are gears more efficient than solid pinions?

A: Yes, and dirt can fall through the rods rather than becoming trapped and increasing wear.

Q: Is gear bigger than the other?

A: Yes, and a mechanical advantage is produced, with the rotational speeds, and the torques, of the two gears differing in proportion to their diameters.

Q: Is gear most common in motor vehicle drive trains?

A: Yes, and in concert with a differential.

Q: Are gears used with the helix angle of one having the negative of the helix angle of the other?

A: Yes, such a pair might also be referred to as having a right-handed helix and a left-handed helix of equal angles.

Q: Are gears used in low speed applications and in situations where noise control is not a problem?

A: Yes, and helical gears are used in high speed applications, large power transmission, or where noise abatement is important.

Q: Are gears 3?

A: Yes, and 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12, 16, 20, 24, 32, 48, 64, 72, 80, 96, 100, 120, and 200.

Q: Are gears on parallel shafts sum of no?

A: Yes.

Q: Are gears more difficult to manufacture due to their more complicated shape?

A: Yes.

Q: Is gear the base pitch in the normal plane?

A: Yes.

Q: Is gear one with the teeth formed on the inner surface of a cylinder or cone?

A: Yes.

Q: Are gears similar but the difference is that herringbone gears don't have a groove in the middle like double helical gears do?

A: Yes.

Q: Are gears normally limited to gear ratios of less than 10:1 while worm-and-gear sets vary from 10:1 to 500:1?

A: Yes, A disadvantage is the potential for considerable sliding action, leading to low efficiency.

Q: Is gear also sometimes meshed with an escapement such as found in mechanical clocks?

A: Yes.

Q: Is gear a specialized gearing mechanism often used in industrial motion control?

A: Yes, and robotics and aerospace for its advantages over traditional gearing systems, including lack of backlash, compactness and high gear ratios.

Q: Are gears still used in mechanical clocks?

A: Yes.

Q: Are gears the simplest type of gear?

A: Yes.

Q: Is gear one with the teeth formed on the outer surface of a cylinder or cone?

A: Yes.

Q: Is gear that at least one tooth persists for a full rotation around the helix?

A: Yes.

Q: Is gear shaped like a right circular cone with most of its tip cut off?

A: Yes.

Q: Is gear a species of helical gear?

A: Yes, but its helix angle is usually somewhat large and its body is usually fairly long in the axial direction.