Fuel FAQs:


Q: Is fuel any material that can be made to react with other substances so that it releases chemical or nuclear energy as heat or to be used for work?

A: Yes.

Q: Is fuel any material that is consumed to derive nuclear energy?

A: Yes.

Q: Are fuels 235U and 239Pu?

A: Yes, and the actions of mining, refining, purifying, using, and ultimately disposing of these elements together make up the nuclear fuel cycle, which is important for its relevance to nuclear power generation and nuclear weapons.

Q: Are fuels non-renewable resources because they take millions of years to form?

A: Yes, and reserves are being depleted much faster than new ones are being made.

Q: Were fuels rapidly adopted during the Industrial Revolution?

A: Yes, because they were more concentrated and flexible than traditional energy sources, such as water power.

Q: Is fuel exhausted?

A: Yes, and nuclear fusion can continue with progressively heavier elements, although the net energy released is lower because of the smaller difference in nuclear binding energy.

Q: Is fuel provided by hydrogen?

A: Yes, and which can combine to form helium through the proton-proton chain reaction or by the CNO cycle.

Q: Are fuels uranium-235 and plutonium-239?

A: Yes, The actions of mining, refining, purifying, using, and ultimately disposing of nuclear fuel together make up the nuclear fuel cycle.

Q: Was fuel the combustion of wood or sticks by Homo erectus nearly 2,000,000 years ag?

A: Yes, and he combustion of wood or sticks by Homo erectus nearly 2,000,000 years ago.

Q: Are fuels a source of energy?

A: Yes.

Q: Are fuels liquids?

A: Yes, because vehicles usually require high energy density.

Q: Are fuels also used in the cells of organisms in a process known as cellular respiration?

A: Yes, where organic molecules are oxidized to release usable energy.

Q: Are fuels struck by neutrons?

A: Yes, and they are in turn capable of emitting neutrons when they break apart.

Q: Are fuels that they are easy to transport?

A: Yes, and can be handled with relative ease.

Q: Are fuels substances that release energy by reacting with substances around them?

A: Yes, and most notably by the process of combustion.

Q: Are fuels converted into mechanical energy via a heat engine?

A: Yes.

Q: Are fuels hydrocarbons?

A: Yes, and primarily coal and petroleum , formed from the fossilized remains of ancient plants and animals by exposure to high heat and pressure in the absence of oxygen in the Earth's crust over hundreds of millions of years.

Q: Are fuels those that will produce energy without being placed under extreme duress?

A: Yes.

Q: Are fuels combustible or energy-generating molecules that can be harnessed to create mechanical energy, usually producing kinetic energy?

A: Yes, they also must take the shape of their container.

Q: Is fuel a material that can be 'burned' by nuclear fission or fusion to derive nuclear energy?

A: Yes.

Q: Are fuels divided in two ways?

A: Yes.