Father FAQs:


Q: Is father the male parent of a child?

A: Yes.

Q: Were fathers often feared by their children?

A: Yes.

Q: Is father a man whose biological relationship to a child is alleged but has not been established?

A: Yes.

Q: Was father so rooted in his ability to match the breadwinner model?

A: Yes, and the inability for a father to provide financially meant that many father's identities as successful members of the family were challenged.

Q: Are fathers regarded as secondary caregivers?

A: Yes.

Q: Is father a male who has become the child's parent through the legal process of adoption?

A: Yes.

Q: Were fathers unable to increase time spent with their children though due to long work days and work weeks?

A: Yes.

Q: Were fathers also expected to devote a period of time towards their children?

A: Yes.

Q: Are fathers usually the ones guarding the offspring at the end of the line while the mothers lead the way?

A: Yes.

Q: Is father the male genetic contributor to the creation of the baby?

A: Yes, and through sexual intercourse or sperm donation.

Q: Was father also deemed to be someone who would bring other experts into the process of childrearing?

A: Yes, and including doctors, nurses, social workers and teachers.

Q: Is father a male who is the husband of a child's mother and they may form a family unit?

A: Yes, but who generally does not have the legal rights and responsibilities of a parent in relation to the child.

Q: Were fathers recommended to spend one hour per week with their sons?

A: Yes.

Q: Were fathers often different?

A: Yes.

Q: Was father someone who was the main economic provider of the family?

A: Yes, and athletic, moral, devoted a portion of his time to his children and was a good husband to his wife.