Equation FAQs:


Q: Is an equation a statement of an equality containing one or more variables?

A: Yes.

Q: Is an equation analogous to a scale into which weights are placed?

A: Yes.

Q: Are equations used to model processes that involve the rates of change of the variable?

A: Yes, and are used in areas such as physics, chemistry, biology, and economics.

Q: Are equations called a parametric representation of the curve?

A: Yes.

Q: Are equations difficult in general?

A: Yes, one often searches just to find the existence or absence of a solution, and, if they exist, to count the number of solutions.

Q: Is an equation univariate if it involves only one variable?

A: Yes.

Q: Is an equation an equation where the unknown is a function f which occurs in the equation through f?

A: Yes, and f , …, f , for some whole integer k called the order of the equation.

Q: Are equations studied from several different perspectives?

A: Yes, and mostly concerned with their solutions — the set of functions that satisfy the equation.

Q: Is an equation true for only particular values of the variables?

A: Yes.

Q: Is an equation usually preferred to algebraic equation?

A: Yes.

Q: Are equations a set of simultaneous equations?

A: Yes, and usually in several unknowns, for which the common solutions are sought.

Q: Is an equation one for which exponents of the terms of the equation can be unknowns?

A: Yes.

Q: Are equations simultaneously satisfied?

A: Yes.

Q: Are equations equivalent if they have the same set of solutions?

A: Yes.

Q: Is an equation analogous to a weighing scale?

A: Yes, and balance, or seesaw.

Q: Are equations used to describe geometric figures?

A: Yes.

Q: Is an equation a polynomial equation in two or more unknowns for which only the integer solutions are sought?

A: Yes, A linear Diophantine equation is an equation between two sums of monomials of degree zero or one.

Q: Is an equation equivalent to an equation in which the right-hand side is zero?

A: Yes.

Q: Are equations to be considered collectively?

A: Yes, and rather than individually.

Q: Is an equation a mathematical equation that relates some function with its derivatives?

A: Yes.

Q: Is an equation usually written ax2 + bx + c = 0?

A: Yes, The process of finding the solutions, or in case of parameters, expressing the unknowns in terms of the parameters is called solving the equation.

Q: Is an equation ax + by = c where a?

A: Yes, and b, and c are constants.

Q: Are equations equations that involve one or more functions and their derivatives?

A: Yes.

Q: Are equations solvable by explicit formulas?

A: Yes, however, some properties of solutions of a given differential equation may be determined without finding their exact form.