Elbow FAQs:


Q: Is elbow specific to humans and other primates?

A: Yes.

Q: Is elbow due to injury?

A: Yes.

Q: Is elbow one of the most commonly dislocated joints in the body?

A: Yes, and with an average annual incidence of acute dislocation of 6 per 100,000 persons.

Q: Is elbow unlikely to have a fracture and an X-ray is not required as long as an olecranon fracture is ruled out?

A: Yes.

Q: Is elbow similarly adapted for stability through a wide range of pronation-supination and flexion-extension in all apes?

A: Yes, and there are some minor differences.

Q: Is elbow through the deep nodes at the bifurcation of the brachial artery?

A: Yes, and the superficial nodes drain the forearm and the ulnar side of the hand.

Q: Is elbow to properly place the hand in space by shortening and lengthening the upper limb?

A: Yes.

Q: Is elbow flexed?

A: Yes, and they form an equilateral triangle called the Hueter triangle.

Q: Is elbow a very common type of overuse injury?

A: Yes.

Q: Is elbow from 0 degrees of elbow extension to 150 of elbow flexion?

A: Yes.

Q: Is elbow very similar to tennis elbow?

A: Yes, but less common.

Q: Is elbow overuse injuries: tennis elbow and golfer's elbow?

A: Yes.

Q: Is elbow grouped at the sides of the joint in order not to interfere with its movement?

A: Yes.

Q: Is elbow flexed slowly?

A: Yes.

Q: Is elbow second only to a dislocated shoulder?

A: Yes.

Q: Is elbow innervated anteriorly by branches from the musculocutaneous?

A: Yes, and median, and radial nerve, and posteriorly from the ulnar nerve and the branch of the radial nerve to anconeus.