District FAQs:


Q: Is a district a type of administrative division that?

A: Yes, and in some countries, is managed by local government.

Q: Are districts generally considered to be two different types of territorial authority?

A: Yes, and the area covered by a city is often known as its district—for example the term district plan is used equally in districts and cities.

Q: Are districts still part of the parent city and governed by the laws and ordinances of that city?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a district not always a simple division of a region: several districts lie within two regions?

A: Yes, and the Taupo District lies in four.

Q: Is a district a self-governing administrative unit?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a district a division of a state?

A: Yes.

Q: Are districts most frequently further sub-divided into smaller administrative units?

A: Yes, and called either tehsils or talukas or mavattams, depending on the region.

Q: Is a district headed by a Deputy Commissioner/ Collector?

A: Yes, and who is responsible for the overall administration and the maintenance of law and order.

Q: Are districts municipal electoral subdivisions of boroughs?

A: Yes, and which are subdivisions of cities.

Q: Are districts the most recognizable form of local government in large parts of England?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a district usually named after the main town or its administrative capital?

A: Yes, for example, Sandakan town is the capital of the district of Sandakan, as well the capital of Sandakan Division.

Q: Were districts established on January 1?

A: Yes, and 2013.

Q: Is a district allowed to vote in the election for the member of the House of Representatives from that district?

A: Yes.

Q: Are districts no longer used?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a district a statutory subdivision of the province?

A: Yes, and but, unlike a county, a district is not incorporated.

Q: Are districts used in state elections?

A: Yes.

Q: Are districts local administrative units inherited from the British Raj?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a district known as Daerah in Malay?

A: Yes.

Q: Are districts composed of unincorporated lands?

A: Yes, and mostly Crown land.

Q: Is a district headed by a district nazim?

A: Yes, and who is an elected official and the local controller of the district level officers of all the departments under provincial government.

Q: Is a district allowed to vote in the election for the member of the House of Representatives from that district?

A: Yes.

Q: Were districts also used in several states as cadastral units for land titles?

A: Yes.

Q: Were districts subdivisions of counties?

A: Yes, and formed under the Local Government Act 1929.

Q: Are districts "Landkreise"?

A: Yes, and rural districts.

Q: Was a district a reference to the land district?

A: Yes, though sometimes to mining divisions.

Q: Is a district the basic unit of general administration in Austria?

A: Yes.

Q: Are districts divided into divisions?

A: Yes.

Q: Are districts the most common?

A: Yes, but other types of districts include community college districts, hospital districts, utility districts, irrigation districts, port districts, and public transit districts.

Q: Are districts a recent innovation?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a district a subdivision within a division of a state?

A: Yes.

Q: Are districts local administrative units?

A: Yes.

Q: Were districts the first subdivision of the départements from the 4 March 1790 to the 28 pluviôse an VIII?

A: Yes, Then, in the 20th century, districts were a type of intercommunity, they've been replaced by communauté de communes and communautés d'agglomération after 1999.

Q: Are districts types of rural municipalities?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a district divided into at least two provincial districts?

A: Yes.

Q: Were districts generally grouped into administrative divisions?

A: Yes, and which in turn formed provinces.

Q: Is a district called a Gemarkung, a term most often used for smaller rural areas?

A: Yes, A Gemarkung is usually associated with and named after a central town or village.