Disgust FAQs:


Q: Is disgust an emotional response of revulsion to something considered offensive?

A: Yes, and distasteful, or unpleasant.

Q: Is disgust often associated with a feeling that some image of what is pure has been violated?

A: Yes.

Q: Was disgust found to be one of these facial expressions?

A: Yes.

Q: Was disgust the strongest predictor of negative attitudes toward obese individuals?

A: Yes.

Q: Is disgust one of the basic emotions recognizable across multiple cultures and is a response to something revolting typically involving taste or sight?

A: Yes.

Q: Is disgust experienced primarily in relation to the sense of taste?

A: Yes, and secondarily to anything which causes a similar feeling by sense of smell, touch, or vision.

Q: Is disgust also theorized as an evaluative emotion that can control moral behavior?

A: Yes.

Q: Is disgust experienced and recognized almost universally and strongly implicates its evolutionary significance?

A: Yes.

Q: Is disgust negatively correlated to aggression because feelings of disgust typically bring about a need to withdraw while aggression results in a need to approach?

A: Yes.

Q: Is disgust readily recognizable across cultures?

A: Yes.

Q: Is disgust further supported by neuropsychological studies?

A: Yes.

Q: Is disgust a sensation that refers to something revolting?

A: Yes.

Q: Is disgust a fundamental and unmistakable example?

A: Yes.

Q: Is disgust an emotion with physical responses to undesirable or dirty situations?

A: Yes, and studies have proven there are cardiovascular and respiratory changes while experiencing the emotion of disgust.

Q: Is disgust also important among species as it has been found that when an individual sees a conspecific looking disgusted after tasting a particular food?

A: Yes, and he or she automatically infers that the food is bad and should not be eaten.

Q: Is disgust as a primary?

A: Yes, or visceral, emotion , they may imitate it.

Q: Is disgust also known to have originally evolved as a response to unpleasant food that may have been carriers of disease?

A: Yes.

Q: Is disgust believed to have evolved as a component of a behavioral immune system in which the body attempts to avoid disease-carrying pathogens in preference to fighting them after they have entered the body?

A: Yes.

Q: Was disgust first thought to be a motivation for humans to only physical contaminants?

A: Yes, and it has since been expanded to apply to moral and social moral contaminants as well.

Q: Is disgust associated with a decrease in heart rate?

A: Yes.

Q: Is disgust often built upon prejudices that should be challenged and rebutted?

A: Yes.

Q: Is disgust one of the basic emotions of Robert Plutchik's theory of emotions and has been studied extensively by Paul Rozin?

A: Yes.

Q: Is disgust partially a result of social conditioning?

A: Yes, and there are differences among different cultures in the objects of disgust.