Desire FAQs:


Q: Is desire a sense of longing or hoping for a person?

A: Yes, and object, or outcome.

Q: Is desire the behavioural stage of response?

A: Yes.

Q: Is desire the driving force for both Scarlett and the hero, Rhett""?

A: Yes, Scarlett desires love, money, the attention of men, and the vision of being a virtuous "true lady". Rhett Butler desires to be with Scarlett, which builds to a burning longing that is ultimately his undoing, because Scarlett keeps refuses his advances; when she finally confesses her secret desire, Rhett is worn out and his longing is spent.

Q: Are desires often classified as emotions by laypersons, psychologists often describe desires as different from emotions?

A: Yes, psychologists tend to argue that desires arise from bodily structures, such as the stomach's need for food, whereas emotions arise from a person's mental state.

Q: Is desire implicated in animal interactions and the propensity of animals to motion?

A: Yes, at the same time, he acknowledges that reasoning also interacts with desire.

Q: Is desire not considered to be a bad thing in and of itself?

A: Yes, rather, it is a powerful force within the human that, once submitted to the Lordship of Christ, can become a tool for good, for advancement, and for abundant living.

Q: Is desire a key motivating influence on the narrative of the film?

A: Yes, and both in the 'real world', and within the text.

Q: Is desire at the core of romance novels?

A: Yes, and which often create drama by showing cases where human desire is impeded by social conventions, class, or cultural barriers.

Q: Is desire the fundamental motivation of all human action?

A: Yes.

Q: Are desires the ones making choices for them?

A: Yes.

Q: Is desire seen as something that can either lead a person towards God and destiny or away from him?

A: Yes.

Q: Is desire stimulated to find more effective ways to induce consumers into buying a given product or service?

A: Yes.

Q: Is desire also used in other literary genres, such as Gothic novels?

A: Yes, Poets ranging from Homer to Toni Morrison have dealt with the themes of desire in their work.

Q: Is desire central to the written fiction genre of romance?

A: Yes, and it is the central theme of melodrama films, which are a subgenre of the drama film.

Q: Is desire at the core of the romance novel?

A: Yes.

Q: Is desire a consumer’s affective response to the acknowledged or remembered presence of a need?

A: Yes, this need recognition is usually induced by a marketing message, communicated to the consumer by marketers. To understand this concept in more depth, it is helpful to first consider how desire fits into the marketing communications process; marketers call this process the linear model of communication.

Q: Are desires often classified as emotions by laypersons?

A: Yes, and psychologists often describe desires as different from emotions.

Q: Is desire central to the written fiction genre of romance?

A: Yes, and it is the central theme of melodrama films, which use plots that appeal to the heightened emotions of the audience by showing "crises of human emotion, failed romance or friendship", in which desire is thwarted or unrequited.