Competition FAQs:


Q: Is competition often considered to be the opposite of cooperation?

A: Yes, and however in the real world, mixtures of cooperation and competition are the norm.

Q: Is competition also found in trade?

A: Yes.

Q: Is competition considered learned behaviors?

A: Yes, because the human species learns to adapt to environmental pressures.

Q: Is competition a free entry lottery run to promote goods or services supplied by a business?

A: Yes.

Q: Is competition also a major tenet of market economies and business It is often associated with business competition as most companies are in competition with at least one other firm over the same group of customers?

A: Yes.

Q: Is competition a major factor in education?

A: Yes.

Q: Is competition also present between species?

A: Yes, When resources are limited, several species may depend on these resources.

Q: Are competitions known as compers?

A: Yes.

Q: Is competition also one of the most important factors controlling diversity in ecological communities?

A: Yes, but at larger scales expansion and contraction of ecological space is a much more larger factor than competition.

Q: Is competition also found in politics?

A: Yes.

Q: Is competition evident by the policies undertaken by these countries to educate the future workforce?

A: Yes.

Q: Are competitions recreation?

A: Yes, and there exist several major and minor professional sports leagues throughout the world.

Q: Are competitions a trade promotion lottery or lottos?

A: Yes.

Q: Is competition typically called budget competition?

A: Yes.

Q: Is competition to a greater or lesser extent regulated by competition policy and competition law?

A: Yes.

Q: Is competition generally broken down into three categories: individual sports, such as archery?

A: Yes, dual sports, such as doubles tennis, and team sports competition, such as cricket or football.