Chimney FAQs:


Q: Is a chimney a structure that provides ventilation for hot flue gases or smoke from a boiler?

A: Yes, and stove, furnace or fireplace to the outside atmosphere.

Q: Were chimneys built?

A: Yes, and often more than 3 km long, which typically terminated in a short vertical chimney in a remote location where the fumes would cause less harm.

Q: Is a chimney the driving force that moves the required combustion air into the combustion zone and also moves the flue gas up and out of the chimney?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a chimney at the keep of Conisbrough Castle in Yorkshire?

A: Yes, and which dates from 1185 AD.

Q: Are chimneys used for carrying antennas of mobile phone services and low power FM/TV-transmitters?

A: Yes.

Q: Are chimneys they develop deposits of creosote on the walls of the structure when used with wood as a fuel?

A: Yes.

Q: Are chimneys typically vertical?

A: Yes, or as near as possible to vertical, to ensure that the gases flow smoothly, drawing air into the combustion in what is known as the stack, or chimney, effect.

Q: Are chimneys known as class A and class B chimneys?

A: Yes.

Q: Were chimneys of a simple brick construction?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a chimney built?

A: Yes.

Q: Were chimneys constructed by placing the bricks around tile liners?

A: Yes.

Q: Are chimneys the use of built in ovens which allowed the household to bake at home?

A: Yes.

Q: Are chimneys commonly referred to as flue gas stacks and are generally external structures?

A: Yes, as opposed to those built into the wall of a building.

Q: Is a chimney called a flue?

A: Yes.