Capacitor FAQs:


Q: Is a capacitor a passive two-terminal electrical component that stores electrical energy in an electric field?

A: Yes.

Q: Are capacitors widely used in electronic circuits for blocking direct current while allowing alternating current to pass?

A: Yes.

Q: Are capacitors generally small?

A: Yes, and cheap and useful for high frequency applications, although their capacitance varies strongly with voltage and temperature and they age poorly.

Q: Are capacitors often impregnated with a liquid to improve its properties?

A: Yes.

Q: Are capacitors dipped in a hard thermoplastic?

A: Yes.

Q: Are capacitors typically non-polarized electrolytic types?

A: Yes, while running capacitors are conventional paper or plastic film dielectric types.

Q: Are capacitors usually employed with a low-value resistor in series?

A: Yes, and to dissipate energy and minimize RFI.

Q: Are capacitors limited?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a capacitor known as capacitance?

A: Yes.

Q: Are capacitors stored with the terminals shorted?

A: Yes, as protection from potentially dangerous voltages due to dielectric absorption or from transient voltages the capacitor may pick up from static charges or passing weather events.

Q: Are capacitors widely used as parts of electrical circuits in many common electrical devices?

A: Yes.

Q: Are capacitors combined in series to achieve a higher working voltage?

A: Yes, for example for smoothing a high voltage power supply.

Q: Is a capacitor the inductor?

A: Yes, and which stores energy in a magnetic field rather than an electric field.

Q: Are capacitors specifically designed to work on line voltage AC power circuits?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a capacitor typically mounted to the side of the motor housing?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a capacitor specifically designed to provide and enhance this effect for a variety of practical applications by consideration of size?

A: Yes, and shape, and positioning of closely spaced conductors, and the intervening dielectric material.

Q: Is a capacitor usually determined?

A: Yes, and foremost, by the amount of energy stored, which is the cause of things like electrical burns or heart fibrillation.

Q: Were capacitors known as condensers?

A: Yes, and a term that is still occasionally used today, particularly in high power applications, such as automotive systems.

Q: Are capacitors conditioned when manufactured by applying a voltage sufficient to initiate the proper internal chemical state?

A: Yes.

Q: Were capacitors used for high voltage and high frequency application in the transmitters?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a capacitor limited by the breakdown voltage?

A: Yes.

Q: Are capacitors used for power factor correction?

A: Yes.

Q: Are capacitors given not in farads but rather as a reactive power in volt-amperes reactive?

A: Yes, The purpose is to counteract inductive loading from devices like electric motors and transmission lines to make the load appear to be mostly resistive.

Q: Are capacitors described in British Patent 587,953 in 194?

A: Yes, and escribed in British Patent 587,953 in 1944.

Q: Are capacitors usually used because of their small size and low cost compared with other types?

A: Yes, unless their relatively poor stability, life and polarised nature make them unsuitable.

Q: Are capacitors used in power supplies where they smooth the output of a full or half wave rectifier?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a capacitor the ratio of its reactance to its resistance at a given frequency?

A: Yes, and is a measure of its efficiency.

Q: Are capacitors different from resistors and inductors in that the impedance is inversely proportional to the defining characteristic?

A: Yes, i.e., capacitance.

Q: Are capacitors used to conduct a varying signal from the plate of one tube to the grid circuit of the next stage?

A: Yes.

Q: Are capacitors exploited as dynamic memory in early digital computers?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a capacitor charged or discharged?

A: Yes.

Q: Are capacitors used to store small and larger amounts of energy?

A: Yes, and respectively, ceramic capacitors are often used in resonators, and parasitic capacitance occurs in circuits wherever the simple conductor-insulator-conductor structure is formed unintentionally by the configuration of the circuit layout.

Q: Are capacitors used as the sensor in condenser microphones?

A: Yes, where one plate is moved by air pressure, relative to the fixed position of the other plate.

Q: Is a capacitor driven with a time-varying voltage that changes rapidly enough?

A: Yes, and at some frequency the polarization of the dielectric cannot follow the voltage.

Q: Is a capacitor attached across a battery?

A: Yes, and an electric field develops across the dielectric, causing a net positive charge to collect on one plate and net negative charge to collect on the other plate.

Q: Is a capacitor proportional to the surface area of the plates and inversely related to the gap between them?

A: Yes.

Q: Are capacitors also used in parallel to interrupt units of a high-voltage circuit breaker in order to equally distribute the voltage between these units?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a capacitor identical?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a capacitor zero and the voltage across the resistor is V0?

A: Yes.

Q: Are capacitors unused for a long period of time it can lose its conditioning?

A: Yes.

Q: Are capacitors connected in parallel with the power circuits of most electronic devices and larger systems to shunt away and conceal current fluctuations from the primary power source to provide a "clean" power supply for signal or control circuits?

A: Yes.

Q: Are capacitors available with a vacuum between their plates to allow extremely high voltage operation and low losses?

A: Yes.

Q: Are capacitors broadly categorized as class 1 dielectrics?

A: Yes, and which have predictable variation of capacitance with temperature or class 2 dielectrics, which can operate at higher voltage.

Q: Is a capacitor made from a dielectric that uses phosphorescence to produce light?

A: Yes.

Q: Are capacitors used to accurately measure the fuel level in airplanes?

A: Yes, as the fuel covers more of a pair of plates, the circuit capacitance increases.

Q: Are capacitors used extensively in suppression circuits?

A: Yes, and motor start circuits, and power factor correction circuits.

Q: Are capacitors commonly used in electronic devices to maintain power supply while batteries are being changed?

A: Yes.

Q: Are capacitors extremely reliable?

A: Yes, and stable and tolerant to high temperatures and voltages, but are too expensive for most mainstream applications.

Q: Were capacitors invented by Bell Laboratories in the early 1950s as a miniaturized and more reliable low-voltage support capacitor to complement their newly invented transistor?

A: Yes.

Q: Were capacitors invented in 1909 by William Dubilier?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a capacitor a component that?

A: Yes, while not serving as its main use, has capacitance and is used to conduct signals through a conductive sheet.

Q: Are capacitors used in the construction of electroluminescent panels?

A: Yes, for applications such as backlighting for laptop computers.

Q: Were capacitors used for resonant circuits?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a capacitor like a rubber membrane sealed inside a pipe?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a capacitor used to hold the high voltage?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a capacitor charged, the larger its voltage drop?

A: Yes, i.e., the more it "pushes back" against the charging current.

Q: Was a capacitor therefore historically first known as an electric condenser?

A: Yes.

Q: Are capacitors found in very old fluorescent lamp ballasts?

A: Yes, and other applications.

Q: Is a capacitor nominally the highest voltage that may be applied across it without undue risk of breaking down the dielectric layer?

A: Yes.

Q: Are capacitors designed to maintain a fixed physical structure?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a capacitor a capacitor used to protect one part of a circuit from the effect of another?

A: Yes, for instance to suppress noise or transients.

Q: Are capacitors available commercially in many different forms?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a capacitor available for specialist applications?

A: Yes.

Q: Were capacitors used?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a capacitor storing potential energy?

A: Yes, and analogously to a stretched membrane.

Q: Is a capacitor assumed to be self-contained and isolated?

A: Yes, and with no net electric charge and no influence from any external electric field.