Buckle FAQs:


Q: Are buckles as much in use today as they have been in the past?

A: Yes.

Q: Were buckles similar to Type I buckles but differed by being long and narrow, made of double sheet metal, and attached to small D-shaped buckles?

A: Yes, Type IB “buckle-loops” were even more similar to Type IA buckles, only difference being that instead of dolphin-heads, they were adorned with horse-heads.

Q: Were buckles evident in the graves of the Franks and Burgundies?

A: Yes.

Q: Are buckles gluing individual discs of glass to the metal frame?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a buckle a “buckle-plate” either decorated or plain and consisted of geometric ornaments?

A: Yes.

Q: Were buckles expensive?

A: Yes.

Q: Were buckles not made out of glass?

A: Yes, rather the glass was used as a decorative feature that covered the entire frame of a metal buckle.

Q: Were buckles not entirely made out of leather because a frame and bar of leather would not be substantial enough to carry a prong or the full weight of the belt and anything the belt and buckle intend to support?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a buckle used mostly for ornamentation until the second half of the 14th century where the knightly belt and buckle took on its most splendid form?

A: Yes.

Q: Were buckles also decorated?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a buckle to be washed?

A: Yes.

Q: Are buckles of a simple "D"-shaped frame?

A: Yes, and in which the prong or tongue extends from one side to the other.

Q: Were buckles purely functional for their strength and durability vital to the individual soldier?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a buckle intended to be used for securing a thick material?

A: Yes, such as leather.