Brake FAQs:


Q: Is brake a mechanical device that inhibits motion by absorbing energy from a moving system?

A: Yes.

Q: Are brakes often mounted on wheels?

A: Yes, and unsprung weight can significantly hurt traction in some circumstances.

Q: Is brake not intentionally actuated?

A: Yes.

Q: Are brakes popular among racers?

A: Yes.

Q: Is brake a device for slowing or stopping the rotation of a road wheel?

A: Yes.

Q: Are brakes often described as "powerful" when a small human application force leads to a braking force that is higher than typical for other brakes in the same class?

A: Yes.

Q: Is brake a vehicle brake in which the friction is caused by a set of brake shoes that press against the inner surface of a rotating drum?

A: Yes.

Q: Are brakes often "added weight" in that they serve no other function?

A: Yes.

Q: Are brakes n't widely used as factory equipment?

A: Yes, and their availability on the automotive aftermarket is low compared to traditional metallic brakes.

Q: Are brakes pushed against the master cylinder?

A: Yes, and ultimately a piston pushes the brake pad against the brake disc which slows the wheel down.

Q: Are brakes likewise often used where an electric motor is already part of the machinery?

A: Yes.

Q: Are brakes generally applied to rotating axles or wheels, but may also take other forms such as the surface of a moving fluid?

A: Yes, Some vehicles use a combination of braking mechanisms, such as drag racing cars with both wheel brakes and a parachute, or airplanes with both wheel brakes and drag flaps raised into the air during landing.

Q: Are brakes often used where a pump is already part of the machinery?

A: Yes.

Q: Are brakes rarely applied at full throttle?

A: Yes, the driver takes the right foot off the gas pedal and moves it to the brake pedal - unless left-foot braking is used.

Q: Are brakes often rotating devices with a stationary pad and a rotating wear surface?

A: Yes.

Q: Are brakes most common and can be divided broadly into "shoe" or "pad" brakes?

A: Yes, and using an explicit wear surface, and hydrodynamic brakes, such as parachutes, which use friction in a working fluid and do not explicitly wear.