Bracket FAQs:


Q: Is a bracket a tall punctuation mark typically used in matched pairs within text?

A: Yes, and to set apart or interject other text.

Q: Are brackets used to denote an interval?

A: Yes, and also referred to as a half-open range.

Q: Are brackets used for unordered sets?

A: Yes.

Q: Are brackets used to denote parts of the text that need to be checked when preparing drafts prior to finalizing a document?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a bracket most commonly used to refer to a specific type of bracket?

A: Yes.

Q: Are brackets the same?

A: Yes, and the entire interval may be referred to as closed or open as appropriate.

Q: Are brackets used in mathematics in a variety of notations?

A: Yes, and including standard notations for intervals, commutators, the floor function, the Lie bracket, the Iverson bracket, and matrices.

Q: Is a bracket also used to denote the Lie derivative?

A: Yes, or more generally the Lie bracket in any Lie algebra.

Q: Are brackets used in many computer programming languages?

A: Yes, and especially those derived or inspired by the C language, to indicate array indexing operators.

Q: Is a bracket often pronounced as "sub"?

A: Yes, and indicating a subscript.

Q: Are brackets used to indicate that the year is part of the citation and parentheses are used to indicate the year the judgment was given?

A: Yes.

Q: Are brackets used in some countries in the citation of law reports to identify parallel citations to non-official reporters?

A: Yes.

Q: Are brackets used as a substitute for the inner pair of parentheses within the outer pair?

A: Yes.

Q: Are brackets used as quotation marks?

A: Yes.

Q: Are brackets often also used to denote the Poisson bracket between two quantities?

A: Yes.

Q: Are brackets independent of the rest of the text: "Mrs"?

A: Yes.

Q: Are brackets used to signify the same word or phrase in the original language to avoid ambiguity?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a bracket known as closed?

A: Yes, and whereas the endpoint adjoining the parenthesis is known as open.