Bed FAQs:


Q: Is a bed a piece of furniture which is used as a place to sleep or relax?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a bed similar to a four poster bed?

A: Yes, but the posts usually extend higher and are adorned or draped with cloth, sometimes completely enclosing the bed.

Q: Are beds typically adjustable?

A: Yes, so that the head or feet can be raised or lowered.

Q: Are beds used for children in private homes?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a bed a pre-modern bed whose wooden frame includes crossing ropes to support the typically down-filled single mattress?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a bed probably that of Odysseus: a charpoy woven of rope plays a role in the Odyssey?

A: Yes.

Q: Were beds used in high society in France till the end of the Ancien Régime?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a bed mentioned by Shakespeare in Twelfth Night?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a bed placed?

A: Yes, and certain persons, such as ambassadors or great lords, whom it was desired to honour, were received in a more intimate fashion than the crowd of courtiers.

Q: Were beds little more than piles of straw or some other natural material?

A: Yes, An important change was raising them off the ground, to avoid drafts, dirt, and pests.

Q: Is a bed a small bed for young children?

A: Yes.

Q: Are beds adjustable?

A: Yes, so that a patient can have different parts of her body elevated for medical reasons.

Q: Is a bed a luxury bed with curtains?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a bed a bed that can fold up into a wall or cabinet to save space?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a bed similar to a bunk bed?

A: Yes, and except there is no lower bunk.

Q: Are beds made especially for animals?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a bed a bed that can be adjusted to a number of different positions?

A: Yes.

Q: Were beds a la duchesse?

A: Yes, but in France itself there was great variety both of name and shape.

Q: Are beds used for adults in military barracks and in some ski lodges?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a bed a bed whose frame folds in half and rolls in order to be more easily stored and moved?

A: Yes.

Q: Are beds available in many sizes?

A: Yes, and ranging from infant-sized bassinets and cribs, to small beds for a single child or adult, to large queen and king-size beds designed for two adults.

Q: Is a bed a cheaper bed of iron with a thin covering of brass?

A: Yes, and which with time peels off and the iron is exposed.

Q: Is a bed a bed with four posts?

A: Yes, and one in each corner, that support a tester.

Q: Are beds designed for couples?

A: Yes, they use two separate mattresses and adjustment mechanisms.

Q: Is a bed a couch that is used as a seat by day and as a bed by night?

A: Yes.

Q: Were beds commonly quite simple in form—the four poster was the usual citizen's bed until the middle of the 19th century?

A: Yes.

Q: Are beds used for children and teens in summer camps?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a bed two or more beds one atop the other?

A: Yes.

Q: Are beds single mattresses on a fixed frame?

A: Yes, and there are other varieties, such as the murphy bed, which folds into a wall, the sofa bed, which folds out of a sofa, and the bunk bed, which provides two mattresses on two tiers.

Q: Is a bed specifically designed to facilitate convalescence?

A: Yes, and traditionally in a hospital or nursing facility, but increasingly in other settings, such as a private residence.

Q: Is a bed a mattress resting on a solid?

A: Yes, and flat raised surface, either free-standing or part of the structure of the room.

Q: Is a bed a bed having the form of a large box with wooden roof, sides, and ends, opening in front with two sliding panels or shutters?

A: Yes, often used in cottages in Scotland: sometimes also applied to a bed arranged to fold up into a box.

Q: Is a bed a flexible plastic mattress full of water?

A: Yes.