Azimuth FAQs:


Q: Is an azimuth the angle between the north vector and the perpendicular projection of the star down onto the horizon?

A: Yes.

Q: Is an azimuth usually denoted alpha?

A: Yes, and α, and defined as a horizontal angle measured clockwise from a north base line or meridian.

Q: Is an azimuth typically true north?

A: Yes, and measured as a 0° azimuth, though other angular units can be used.

Q: Is an azimuth nearly always measured from the north?

A: Yes.

Q: Is an azimuth one of the two coordinates?

A: Yes.

Q: Is an azimuth simpler to calculate?

A: Yes, Bomford says Cunningham's formula is exact for any distance.

Q: Is an azimuth sometimes referred to as a bearing?

A: Yes.

Q: Is an azimuth the angle measured at our viewpoint by a theodolite whose axis is perpendicular to the surface of the spheroid?

A: Yes, geodetic azimuth is the angle between north and the geodesic; that is, the shortest path on the surface of the spheroid from our viewpoint to Point 2. The difference is usually immeasurably small; if Point 2 is not more than 100 km away, the difference will not exceed 0.03 arc second.

Q: Is an azimuth in all European languages today?

A: Yes.

Q: Is an azimuth linked in the distance article?

A: Yes.

Q: Is an azimuth clockwise relative to the north?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a azimuth usually measured in degrees?

A: Yes, The concept is used in navigation, astronomy, engineering, mapping, mining and artillery.

Q: Is an azimuth the direction of a celestial body from the observer?

A: Yes.