Autoclave FAQs:


Q: Is an autoclave a pressure chamber used to carry out industrial processes requiring elevated temperature and pressure different from ambient air pressure?

A: Yes.

Q: Are autoclaves widely used in microbiology?

A: Yes, and medicine, podiatry, tattooing, body piercing, veterinary medicine, mycology, funeral homes, dentistry, and prosthetics fabrication.

Q: Are autoclaves of particular importance in poorer countries due to the much greater amount of equipment that is re-used?

A: Yes.

Q: Are autoclaves also widely used to cure composites and in the vulcanization of rubber?

A: Yes.

Q: Are autoclaves used in medical applications to perform sterilization and in the chemical industry to cure coatings and vulcanize rubber and for hydrothermal synthesis?

A: Yes.

Q: Are autoclaves found in many medical settings?

A: Yes, and laboratories, and other places that need to ensure the sterility of an object.

Q: Is an autoclave a device that uses steam to sterilize equipment and other objects?

A: Yes.

Q: Was an autoclave invented by Charles Chamberland in 1879?

A: Yes, although a precursor known as the steam digester was created by Denis Papin in 1679.

Q: Are autoclaves used to sterilize equipment and supplies by subjecting them to high-pressure saturated steam at 121 °C for around 15–20 minutes depending on the size of the load and the contents?

A: Yes.

Q: Is an autoclave used to grow crystals under high temperatures and pressures?

A: Yes.

Q: Are autoclaves the pre-disposal treatment and sterilization of waste material?

A: Yes, such as pathogenic hospital waste.