Argument FAQs:


Q: Is argument a series of statements typically used to persuade someone of something or to present reasons for accepting a conclusion?

A: Yes.

Q: Is argument reasonable and the premises support the conclusion unless additional information indicating that the case is an exception comes in?

A: Yes.

Q: Is argument uncogent?

A: Yes.

Q: Is argument a praxeologic concept?

A: Yes.

Q: Are arguments sometimes referred to as "truth-preserving" arguments?

A: Yes.

Q: Are arguments made up of a "chain of indispensability claims" that attempt to show why something is necessarily true based on its connection to our experience, while Nikolas Kompridis has suggested that there are two types of "fallible" arguments: one based on truth claims, and the other based on the time-responsive disclosure of possibility?

A: Yes, The late French philosopher Michel Foucault is said to have been a prominent advocate of this latter form of philosophical argument.

Q: Is argument formally valid if and only if the denial of the conclusion is incompatible with accepting all the premises?

A: Yes.

Q: Is argument not necessarily true?

A: Yes, and it depends on whether the premises are true.

Q: Is argument valid if and only if the conclusion is true under all interpretations of that argument in which the premises are true?

A: Yes.

Q: Is argument invalid because there is a missing premise—the supply of which would render it valid?

A: Yes.

Q: Is argument not logical?

A: Yes, but profitable.

Q: Is argument a necessary truth and so the conclusion necessarily follows from the premises?

A: Yes, or follows of logical necessity.

Q: Is argument essential to the determination?

A: Yes, and not the actual truth values.

Q: Are arguments often studied in the field of Information Systems to help explain user acceptance of knowledge-based systems?

A: Yes.

Q: Are arguments studied in formal logic and are expressed in a formal language?

A: Yes.

Q: Is argument neither a) advice nor b) moral or economical judgement)?

A: Yes, but the connection between the two.

Q: Is argument a valid argument whose conclusion follows from its premise?

A: Yes, and the premise of which is/are true.

Q: Is argument not a proof?

A: Yes.

Q: Is argument not a guarantee of the truth of its conclusion?

A: Yes.

Q: Is argument said to be valid or invalid?

A: Yes.

Q: Is argument not an explanation?

A: Yes.

Q: Are arguments a group of philosophical arguments that are said to employ a disclosive approach?

A: Yes, and to reveal features of a wider ontological or cultural-linguistic understanding – a "world," in a specifically ontological sense – in order to clarify or transform the background of meaning and "logical space" on which an argument implicitly depends.

Q: Is argument one that?

A: Yes, if valid, has a conclusion that is entailed by its premises.

Q: Is argument said to be strong or weak?

A: Yes.

Q: Is argument said to be cogent if and only if the truth of the argument's premises would render the truth of the conclusion probable?

A: Yes, and the argument's premises are, in fact, true.

Q: Are arguments essential to the process of justifying the validity of any explanation as there are often multiple explanations for any given phenomenon?

A: Yes.

Q: Is argument valid?

A: Yes, and it is a valid deduction, and if its premises are true, the conclusion must be true: a valid argument cannot have true premises and a false conclusion.

Q: Is argument valid and its premises are all true?

A: Yes, and then it is also referred to as sound.

Q: Is argument an informal calculus?

A: Yes, and relating an effort to be performed or sum to be spent, to possible future gain, either economic or moral.

Q: Are arguments regarded as defeasible passages from premises to a conclusion?

A: Yes.

Q: Is argument connected to the immediate circumstances of the person spoken to?

A: Yes.

Q: Is argument valid?

A: Yes.

Q: Are arguments based on generalizations that hold only in the majority of cases?

A: Yes, but are subject to exceptions and defaults.

Q: Is argument said to be cogent if it has all true premises?

A: Yes.

Q: Are arguments sometimes implicit?

A: Yes.

Q: Is argument assumed true, is it probable the conclusion is also true?

A: Yes, If so, the argument is strong.